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SCC, Canadian Hoisting and Rigging Safety Council delivering standardization solutions


March 10, 2014
By Standards Council of Canada

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March 10, 2014 – The Standards Council of Canada (SCC), working with the Canadian Hoisting and Rigging Safety Council (CHRSC), is leading a new project that will dig into the roots of a major challenge facing Canadian crane and hoisting industry operators — differing crane and hoisting reference standards across jurisdictions.

March 10, 2014 – The Standards Council of Canada (SCC), working with the
Canadian Hoisting and Rigging Safety Council (CHRSC), is leading a new
project that will dig into the roots of a major challenge facing
Canadian crane and hoisting industry operators — differing crane and
hoisting reference standards across jurisdictions.

Key Canadian industry sectors that are driving our economic growth, such as the construction, energy, mining, and oil and gas sectors, continue to rely on the safe operation of cranes and hoisting equipment by qualified personnel. A lack of alignment of equipment standards in regulations across various Canadian jurisdictions, increases compliance costs, hinders worker mobility, reduces safety and hurts Canada's economic well-being.

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"Consistency in competence and safety levels is needed, and a national approach to harmonization will help us find common ground and cut through costly roadblocks." says SCC's Chief Executive Officer, John Walter.

SCC is preparing a report that will map out the relevant hoisting standards referenced in regulations across all Canadian jurisdictions. The draft report is expected to be released in April 2014.

Crane and hoisting industry operators bear the brunt of these differing standards across jurisdictions, as they cannot easily cross provincial and territorial boundaries without adjusting for another jurisdiction's standards. The SCC-CHRSC project aims to align standards to improve safety, reduce costs and boost mobility for Canadian workers and employers.

The CHRSC welcomes this work as an important step toward a solution for the crane and rig industry and the other sectors it impacts. "Rigging is a vital safety skills competency when operating a crane," says Dave Earle, Chairmain of the Rigging Working Committee of the CHRSC. "This report will validate many concerns that industry has highlighted, and will trigger some innovative ways to align and resolve these issues."

In 2012, as part of Canada's Economic Action Plan to stimulate business opportunities, the federal government provided an additional $2.1 million annually to SCC to modernize Canada's standardization network. The new SCC-CHRSC project is just one of several initiatives SCC has undertaken in support of the Plan.

For more information
www.scc.ca
www.chrsc.ca


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