Glass Canada

News
Doing it profitably

The most common complaint I hear from glass professionals...


May 9, 2008
By Chris Skalkos

The most common complaint I hear from glass professionals is about the
cost of damaged glass. From glass fabricators to glass contractors,
handling glass products from the plant to the racks or from the truck
to the job site requires the right tools.

The most common complaint I hear from glass professionals is about the cost of damaged glass. From glass fabricators to glass contractors, handling glass products from the plant to the racks or from the truck to the job site requires the right tools. Even the slightest scratch from a dirty vacuum cup can make a difference on budgets with razor thin profit margins.

This issue of Glass Canada presents an advertising feature from companies that specialize in glass handling and transportation products. It is accompanied by an editorial feature reviewing the latest product offerings that are available to the Canadian glass market. I encourage glass industry professionals to contact the companies featured in this edition, as well as their regular suppliers, about the products they need to handle and transport their glass products profitably.

Advertisment

This issue also contains stories on glass imaging. While the technologies that enable the application of patterns or images on tempered and laminated glass have been around for a few years now, they are just starting to make their mark on the Canadian glass industry. It will only be a matter of time before glass companies, big or small, will be quoting on the installation of these products as architects and designers begin to specify them more. Staying on top of what’s happening in this market is the first step to getting a piece of it.

The cover story in this issue also features an example of the more elaborate and complex buildings that large corporations are calling their company headquarters. The trend has been ongoing for companies in boomtown Alberta, but Ontario is still seeing some one-upmanship in this area, especially in the Greater Toronto Area. Although it is not directly mentioned in the article, it raises hope for what the industry commonly refers to as ‘the little guy’, small glass shops that limit themselves to mostly small commercial storefronts.

The new headquarters for Loblaw Companies was glazed by a small glass company that usually does much smaller jobs. The curtainwall systems available to contractors today go up in a snap, bringing bigger jobs such as this within reach of these localized regional companies. There is room for growth in this competitive market. Keeping informed about the tools and products that help you do that is the key.

Enjoy this issue. -end-

Chris Skalkos, editor


Print this page

Related



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*