Community

The insulating glass industry is a fantastic industry to give the world outside views without allowing outside weather or temperatures to enter the building envelope. But sometimes, things can go completely wrong that ruins that experience for customers.
RCI’s Canadian Building Envelope Technology Symposium is a two-day educational program happening Sept. 13 and 14 in Misssauga, Ont., offering cutting-edge information regarding design and repair of modern and/or older building envelopes. Among the many topics being addressed, several will be relevant to glass building envelope fabricators and glazing contractors. The event’s inclusive environment encourages attendees to ask questions and get answers to questions. Speakers offer relevant solutions by referencing real-world examples and case histories.
The Facade Tectonics Forum will present "Healthy and Sustainable Glazing: Designing for people and the planet" July 30 in Vancouver in conjunction with the IGMA Summer Conference. The Facade Tectonics Forum: Vancouver will include speaker presentations as well as panel and interactive discussions addressing the theme The Good and The Bad: Evolving considerations and practices of building facade glazing. Four panels and two special presentations are planned over a full day’s programming, including more than 15 speakers. The Good and The Bad will combine the art, science and technology of the building skin with an unparalleled networking opportunity from the building community.
Facade Tectonics Forum, a glass-industry eduction seminar offered in conjunction with the IGMA Summer Conference, will present "An Icon Renewed - the renovation of Seattle's space needle," July 30 in Vancouver. After over half a century Seattle’s aging 605-foot-tall Space Needle, built in 1962, was in need of a major overhaul. The structure is a visual icon of Seattle and the Pacific Northwest, but the experience of the user is all about view. The capabilities of architectural glass have improved significantly overthe decades since the structure’s original construction, providing significant opportunity for thedesign team. The new incarnation of the Needle is a celebration of contemporary architectural glazing. Join  Blair Payson of OKA and Richard Green ofFront Inc.  as they explore the renovation of Seattle's Space Needle.
The Facade Tectonics Forum will explore the challenges and opportunities inherent in the ongoing trend toward big glass in Vancouver on July 30. The forum is being hosted by the IGMA Summer Conference the day before the association's regular committee meetings and educational events start. Separate registration is required.
Attendees at the Insulating Glass Manufacturing Alliance's Summer Conference, July 30 to Aug. 2 in Vancouver, have the option to attend an additional architectural-glass-focused educational event hosted in the same hotel right before the conference starts. This is the first year for Facade Tectonics Forum, an educational event organized by the not-for-profit Facade Tectonics Institute.
The upcoming IGMA Summer Conference will feature a morning breakfast session for members to discuss the future of the organization with the board of directors. IGMA recently announced its intent to merge with AAMA in the next two years, and this session will give members an opportunity to discuss what that means, the benefits and pitfalls of such a merge, and more. Attendees are encouraged to bring their questions and thoughts about the future for this session.
June 6, 2018 - The boards of directors for the American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) and the Insulating Glass Manufacturers Alliance (IGMA) have engaged in formal discussions with the hope of creating a new unified organization that can better serve the North American fenestration industry.
The Ontario Glass and Metal Association presented its Lifetime Achievement award to Tony Menecola, president of Applewood Glass and Mirror, at its spring golf tournament on May 31 in Milton, Ont. Menecola is president of the Architectural Glass and Metal Contractors Association and the award was presented by that organization's executive director, and long-time friend of Menecola, Noel Marsella.
National CGA activities are presently on hiatus while the association maps a new mission and vision. To help plan the future direction of your glass association, please contact David Langton at
The glass and contract glazing industry in Canada is a sizeable entity employing thousands and one would expect it to have a voice that represents our collective interests on a national basis. In the United States, the National Glass Association recently merged with the Glass Association of North America to create a formidable national presence. I hate to tell you that Canada’s national voice is today on life support.
Here are some highlights from the technical meetings at our very productive and enjoyable Winter Conference in Tucson, Ariz.
At the tender age of 12, Ted Redlarski ran his first business: a small shop repairing bikes. It was a first money-maker. Later, while still in college (age 19), he became one of the youngest company presidents in his native Poland to helm a construction company.
As 2017 approaches, the name of Ottawa’s oldest, largest and most diversified glass company is taking on new meaning. Centennial Glass is about to enter the second half of its first century – it’s 50th anniversary – and it’s thriving under careful management that welcomes new efficiencies while maintaining quality workmanship and excellence in customer service.
There was a chocolate cake on a side table at the Glass 8 office at the eastern edge of Winnipeg. It said ‘Congratulations, Glass 8’ in blue icing. It was explained that the cake was a gift from a client. Not bad for a Thursday.
When National Contract Glazing’s John Bastedo is asked what’s unique about the company, he doesn’t hesitate. “It’s the people,” the vice-president states firmly. “We have a process to put a job through, with many people involved. Each job is passed on, and this keeps us on top of jobs and also shows contractors we are on top of things, which builds our credibility. We are proud of our excellent track record of project completions ranging from less complex store-fronts and entranceways, to multi-story, multi-phase contracts in both the private and public sector.”
In my previous two columns I told you about Fred Fulton’s early days in Toronto, his beginnings in the industry with Pilkington Glass, the start up of Sealite Glass, and the establishment of the Insulating Glass Manufacturers Association of Canada.
There are many stories out there of businesses with humble beginnings that went on to become major success stories. These stories have some elements in common – hard work, risk-taking, seizing opportunity and forging new ways forward, just to name a few. While some business histories may add in these elements, embellishing here and there, all of these elements and more are truly part of the story of Windsor, Ont.-based Contract Glaziers, which began in 1971 as Windsor Glass.

Subscription Centre

 
New Subscription
 
Already a Subscriber
 
Customer Service
 
View Digital Magazine Renew


Coming Events

PGAA Golf
August 23, 2018
Glassbuild
September 12-14, 2018
OGMA Fall Golf
September 20, 2018

We are using cookies to give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. To find out more, read our Privacy Policy.