Patrick Flannery

Patrick Flannery

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The insulating glass industry is a fantastic industry to give the world outside views without allowing outside weather or temperatures to enter the building envelope. But sometimes, things can go completely wrong that ruins that experience for customers.
RCI’s Canadian Building Envelope Technology Symposium is a two-day educational program happening Sept. 13 and 14 in Misssauga, Ont., offering cutting-edge information regarding design and repair of modern and/or older building envelopes. Among the many topics being addressed, several will be relevant to glass building envelope fabricators and glazing contractors. The event’s inclusive environment encourages attendees to ask questions and get answers to questions. Speakers offer relevant solutions by referencing real-world examples and case histories.
The Facade Tectonics Forum will present "Healthy and Sustainable Glazing: Designing for people and the planet" July 30 in Vancouver in conjunction with the IGMA Summer Conference. The Facade Tectonics Forum: Vancouver will include speaker presentations as well as panel and interactive discussions addressing the theme The Good and The Bad: Evolving considerations and practices of building facade glazing. Four panels and two special presentations are planned over a full day’s programming, including more than 15 speakers. The Good and The Bad will combine the art, science and technology of the building skin with an unparalleled networking opportunity from the building community.
The Facade Tectonics Forum will explore the challenges and opportunities inherent in the ongoing trend toward big glass in Vancouver on July 30. The forum is being hosted by the IGMA Summer Conference the day before the association's regular committee meetings and educational events start. Separate registration is required.
Attendees at the Insulating Glass Manufacturing Alliance's Summer Conference, July 30 to Aug. 2 in Vancouver, have the option to attend an additional architectural-glass-focused educational event hosted in the same hotel right before the conference starts. This is the first year for Facade Tectonics Forum, an educational event organized by the not-for-profit Facade Tectonics Institute.
The upcoming IGMA Summer Conference will feature a morning breakfast session for members to discuss the future of the organization with the board of directors. IGMA recently announced its intent to merge with AAMA in the next two years, and this session will give members an opportunity to discuss what that means, the benefits and pitfalls of such a merge, and more. Attendees are encouraged to bring their questions and thoughts about the future for this session.
The federal government has announced retaliatory tariffs on imports from the U.S. of many steel and aluminum products, including "doors, windows and their frames and thresholds for doors." The tariffs are in response to American tarrifs announced in May on steel and aluminum entering the U.S. from Canada. The tariff on fenestration products will be 10 per cent.
The Ontario Glass and Metal Association presented its Lifetime Achievement award to Tony Menecola, president of Applewood Glass and Mirror, at its spring golf tournament on May 31 in Milton, Ont. Menecola is president of the Architectural Glass and Metal Contractors Association and the award was presented by that organization's executive director, and long-time friend of Menecola, Noel Marsella.
I feel I can get away with throwing some shade at an entire profession as I was once employed on the outskirts of it myself. Many years ago when I was between jobs I worked in a call centre for a big American telecommunications provider doing tech support for their web portal. Our explicit instructions were to get the customer off the phone as fast as possible. Indeed, our entire job performance metric depended on it.
It was a great day of spirited conversations among all levels of the Canadian architectural glass industry at Top Glass on April 17 in Mississauga, Ont. Despite the truly unbelievable bad weather in southern Ontario, 315 attendees managed to get to the International Centre, tour 61 exhibitors and sit in four cutting-edge educational sessions. Attendees were about evenly split between architects/specifiers and glazing contractors. 
In what may be a career-ending move, Glass Canada editor Patrick Flannery sat down with Tim Byrne, president of Stadia Glass and Door and host of Tim Byrne Almost Live, for a Scotch-fuelled podcast about the glass industry, the magazine and Flannery's road to get there. 
With 12 days left to go until Canada's architectural glass event, Top Glass organizers are announcing the show floor is sold out with 65 exhibitors in 17,000 square feet. Top Glass takes off April 17 at the International Centre in Mississauga, Ont. Find show details and register for free at topglasscanada.com.
Provincial Glass and Mirror in London, Ont., opened its doors to the media and city dignitaries for a tour and ribbon-cutting ceremony at its new Horton Street location. The 34-year-old company has relocated from its prior facility on York Street and approximately doubled the space it has to operate in with the acquisition of the former Canada Computers space. The move included putting on a snazzy new facade and completely renovating the office space and fabrication shop. All-told, Provincial now has 12,000 square feet to play in, and owner Brett Lucier is thrilled to be able to turn around with his arms outstretched in the spacious new shop.
If everything always stayed the same there would be no need to come out to trade shows. Instead, we are inundated with change. Tightening energy efficiency standards are entering the market unevenly across the country, challenging contractors and fabricators to maintain esthetics and margins as designs adjust.
I heard an interesting statistic the other day on Fareed Zakaria’s excellent international affairs show on CNN. Between 2013 and 2016, income for the lowest 20 per cent of Canada’s wage earners increased 20 per cent. In the U.S., incomes for their lowest 20 per cent fell 16 per cent over the same period. 
Glass Performance Days, a biennial conference held in Tampere, Finland, has released an entire online book full of educational articles provided by its session presenters. The 457-page document contains 91 white papers, each connected to an educational seminar that took place at its 25th event in June last year. The papers discuss just about every imaginable topic in the architectural glass industry.
With heavy hearts the family of Jim Shepherd has announced the sudden passing of their beloved husband, father and grandad on Friday Dec. 8, 2017, at the young age of 65. He is survived by his wife and best friend Marilyn, his devoted son Steven (Julie), his cherished daughter Lynne (Stu) and his grandchildren Cavan, Sam, Tatum, Allie and Jack. Jim and Marilyn married in his birthplace of Dundee, Scotland, where he enjoyed playing soccer and working. He then answered the call of many and moved to Canada to pursue his career as a semi-pro soccer player and forge a new life for his family.
I’m writing this at the start of the new year, which always seems like a good time to take the 30,000-foot view and try to get a sense of where things stand before we drive ahead. Just about everyone I talk to is busier than they want to be, which leaves the question of whether it’s time for investment in the business or to stuff money in the mattress for the inevitable rainy day. Oil prices are still low, so this little boom probably owes more to the surging American economy and its spillover effect on Canada.
Politicians in Saskatchewan have responded to reports of vehicles with Saskatchewan plates being sent away from Alberta construction sites with a ban of their own, igniting a war of words between the provinces. 
Ontario's Bill 142 Construction Lien Ammendment Act has passed third reading in a unanimous vote and will now become law in Ontario. The bill implements most of the recommendations in "Striking the Balance: Expert Review of Ontario's Construction Lien Act," a report prepared for the Attorney General's office last summer. Most notably, a payment period of 35 days for invoices has been enshrined and an arbitration system is to be set up to speed payments without use of the courts.
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