Look here for the clear, the colour-neutral and the energy efficient products that will make your facades shine.
June 2, 2016 - Guardian Glass North America has introduced Guardian UltraClear glass, a low-iron product that delivers maximum clarity and color neutrality without the green tint of standard glass.
June 2, 2016 - C.R. Laurence has announced the release of its new Electric Strike with Bolt Position Sensor. By incorporating a bolt position sensor within the strike housing, CRL’s Electric Strike can electronically notify security and facility managers if doors on the premises are not properly closed and locked.
May 19, 2016 - Solar Innovations, Inc. has announced it has received a patent for its hybrid marine and stop glazing system. The unprecedented design for the marine and stop glazing system combines vertical marine glazing with horizontal stop glazing in order to create a much narrower vertical frame than conventional stop glazed doors.
May 5, 2016 - SolarWindow Technologies has announced that performance tests of its transparent electricity-generating coatings for glass and flexible plastics have produced favorable outcomes for glass-to-glass lamination processes. The test results are especially promising for expanding the application of SolarWindow coatings beyond standard window glass to include high-performance laminated glass – a fast growing segment of the commercial and architectural glass market.
May 5, 2016 - AGC Glass Europe has announced plans to carry out the cold repair of its Cuneo float glass line in Cuneo (Piedmont, Italy). This investment of around 25 million euros is prompted not only by the positive impact that it will have on the productivity of the plant and the expected environmental benefits, but also by the prospect of extending its current range of products.
April 21, 2016 - Major Industries recently expanded their product line with the release of IlluminPC polycarbonate multi-wall glazed wall systems. With this new addition, Major Industries is now the only daylighting manufacturer in the U.S. to offer distinct lines of FRP structural translucent panel systems, glass systems, and polycarbonate multi-wall glazed systems.
April 7, 2016 - CRL-U.S. Aluminum is proud to announce the launch of its new ArcticFront Series 45X Storefront, which delivers optimal thermal performance with the installer-friendly features of a traditional storefront. A key component of the storefront is its dual polyurethane thermal break points that act as a superior thermal barrier.
April 7, 2016 - Fonon Corporation has unveiled ten major updates to the Titan family of large, flat-bed multipurpose laser cutting machines, integrating multiple subsystems and introducing several evolutionary improvements which increase end-user productivity, lower costs over time, minimize the Titan’s floor space footprint and reduce its power consumption.
Mar. 10, 2016 - ​​​Fonon Corporation has introduced its Bulk-To-Shape technology, an umbrella of 3D printing technologies representing a transformational approach to industrial, application-specific metal additive manufacturing. The new technology enables manufacturers to reliably integrate 3D metal printing into full production environments, and demonstrates a potentially disruptive key shift in industrial manufacturing.
Feb. 25, 2016 - CRL-U.S. Aluminum and ARCOM have announced a partnership that will incorporate CRL-U.S. Aluminum products into MasterSpec.
Long track recordbarkow.comSince 1879, F. Barkow Inc. has been building high-quality exterior and interior glass racks. The product line now covers racks for cargo vans and pickup trucks all the way up to semi-trucks and trailers. Barkow’s fully-welded, high-quality, high-performance products are built to safely transport glass and built to last. All Barkow glass carriers are custom-built by hand and are available in aluminum, high-tensile steel or stainless steel.  Stainless steel is more durable than steel or aluminum and is virtually maintenance-free. Barkow’s glass racks are now engineered and designed to fit the new generation of cargo vans, the Ford Transit, the Dodge ProMaster and the Nissan NV. The new vans are modeled after the original European design of the Sprinter and offer fuel-efficient V6 engines to complement the aerodynamic aesthetics. The glass racks designed for these newer vans feature the following: four Stake-Loc self-locking stakes that automatically self-lock into the ledgeboard for safe glass transportation; 24-inch lower splash panels to protect glass from debris during transportation; “B” load-holding slats that allow for the use of straps; and lower mount bars to stabilize the bottom of the glass rack. These features are exclusively designed for added safety and protection while transporting glass. Advanced control systemerdmanautomation.comThe Erdman Hand Assist glazing/back bedding table offers a state-of-the-art servo control system using Erdman’s fluid metering technologies to provide a consistent-diameter bead of sealant to your product at speeds up to 30 inches per second. This machine control will allow any operator to reliably and consistently apply a properly proportioned bead of sealant. Hand Assists are available to perform hot, cold or two-part glazing and can be set up for bead sizes from .06 up to .5 inches diameter. The Hand Assist uses hardware and software brands recognized around the world. Using the Hand Assist, almost anyone can realize professional glazing results in minutes. The table reduces waste by up to 85 per cent and cleanup time as much as 95 per cent. The Hand Assist also reduces rejections due to improper bedding or glazing. Custom models, configurations and sizes are available.New mobile liftersergorobotic.comErgo Robotic Solutions, a manufacturer of glass handling and installation machines in Queensbury, N.Y., has added two new models to its product line-up: the GM 800 and the GM 1200. Built upon the popular workhorse design, the GM 2000-12, the new smaller machines deliver the same reliability, manoeuverability and versatility of their larger counterpart in a smaller form with more affordable pricing. The GM 800 has a lift capacity of 800 pounds and can lift a load to a height of 10 feet to the center of the lift hub. The GM 1200 has a lift capacity of 1,200 pounds and can lift a load to a height of 11 feet. The standard-powered articulations include three boom movements and both vertical and horizontal tilt. Optional add-on power articulations include lateral side shift, rotation, and “EZ Pick”, an Ergo Robotic Solutions innovation for picking up and placing a load in one smooth movement. Visitors to ergorobotic.com can watch a video of a GM 800 performing an outside installation from the inside on a mocked-up wall with ease. The GM 1200 and the GM 2000-12 can all perform the same operation in exactly the same fashion.Power loss warningwpg.comThe Premium edition of Wood’s Powr-Grip’s popular P1 channel lifter now features a dual vacuum system and power loss warning buzzer for added safety, a high-flow vacuum pump and blow-off for greater productivity, and reduced power consumption for extended time on the jobsite. Powr-Grip’s channel lifters are comprised of one or more pad channels for gripping loads plus interchangeable lift frames for rotating and tilting materials. These vacuum lifters may be ordered as complete units or as individual components to expand existing channel lifter systems. Lift frames are available in single-channel or double-channel styles. Pad channels can be switched from one frame to another in minutes. Hydrostatic driveglgcan.comWith the front twin-wheels, and hydrostatic drive, the GlasLift 550/1212 from GLG can operate in all kinds of terrains. The machine lifts 550 kg from floor level up to four meters in a fully parallel operation, offering 430 mm of boom extension. The GlasLift 550/1212 can reduce labor and Workers Compensation costs with increased jobsite productivity and reduced workforce fatigue. The lifter is easily transportable, capable of fitting into jobsite elevators. Precision controls allow millimeter positioning accuracy. The machine weighs 1,450 kg with a maximum width of 46 inches, minimum length of 90 inches and minimum height of 56 inches. The wheels are filled with rubber foam. The GlasLift carries a charge current of 110 or 220 V with 12 2 V batteries. Charging time is approximately five hours with up to 16 hours autonomy. Adjustable rackstheglassrackingcompany.comThe Contractor Glazing Truck from The Glass Racking Company features a 14-foot-long body designed for service companies and companies that require transportation of glass and windows to sites for installation. The Contractor body features a lockable front storage area and a rear bed with a secure-strap glass retaining system. The external racks are fully adjustable in height on the passenger side and allow for glass or windows up to 10 feet high to be transported. All glass racks supplied by the The Glass Racking Company come complete with a full set of spring-loaded external load-retention stakes for load securing.   View the embedded image gallery online at: http://www.glasscanadamag.com/index.php?option=com_k2&view=latest&layout=latest&Itemid=1#sigProGalleria6a0dea5374
RPM Rollformed Metal Products has returned as a Silver Sponsor for Top Glass 2017, Canada's event for the architectural glass industry happening April 20, 2017, at the International Centre in Mississauga, Ont. RPM first became involved as a major show sponsor in 2016.
June 15, 2016 - The CGA is pleased to announce Multiver Limitee as a Silver Sponsor for the 2016 Glass Connections conference.
June 15, 2016 - The American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) celebrated 16 consecutive years of furthering the careers and education of students pursuing a degree related to the building products industry by awarding seven scholarships to children of employees of AAMA member companies. The scholarship award winners were announced during the 2016 AAMA Summer Conference, held June 12-15, in San Antonio. The recipients of 11 AAMA Partner Scholarships also were announced.
When National Contract Glazing’s John Bastedo is asked what’s unique about the company, he doesn’t hesitate. “It’s the people,” the vice-president states firmly. “We have a process to put a job through, with many people involved. Each job is passed on, and this keeps us on top of jobs and also shows contractors we are on top of things, which builds our credibility. We are proud of our excellent track record of project completions ranging from less complex store-fronts and entranceways, to multi-story, multi-phase contracts in both the private and public sector.”
Commdoor Aluminum will once again be a big part of Top Glass, Canada's event for the commercial glazing industry, taking place April 20, 2017, at the International Centre in Mississauga, Ont.
Top Glass broke records on April 20 with 383 attendees, including a strong turnout of 150 architects, specifiers and building engineers. The four one-hour education sessions were standing-room only as attendees flooded in to appreciate the presentations, which were eligible for continuing education credits. Top Glass was supported by generous sponsorships from Gold Sponsors Alumicor and Tremco; Silver Sponsors Commdoor Aluminum and RPM Rollformed Metal Products; and livestream sponsor Sika Canada.
“Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or present are certain to miss the future.”
The IGMA’s first IG Fabricator Workshop was held May 3 through 5 at the Intertek testing facilities in Plano, Texas.  IGMA plans to offer this workshop multiple times each year and at various locations throughout Canada and the U.S.  Oak Moser of Oak Hill Consulting is professionally moderating the workshop.  Oak, formerly a plant manager at a major fabrication facility, brings his years of experience to this new role.
Canadian Glass AssociationThe Canadian Glass Association has prepared a lineup of expert presenters for the 2016 Glass Connections conference. This annual event will be held in Ontario at the Westin Ottawa Hotel on Sept. 13 to 14. The event will open with an evening welcome reception followed by a full day of industry programming.
Dolores Primo was given the Ontario Glass and Metal Association's Lifetime Achievement Award at its spring golf tournament May 26. The presentation marked the first time a woman has won the award. Ennio Rea of Trulite, an OGMA director, noted Primo's many groundbreaking accomplishments over a remarkable 38-year career.
The Ontario Glass and Metal Association held its spring golf tournament May 26 at Piper's Heath in Milton, Ont. The weather did its best to interrupt the day, but golfers got in most of a round under sunny skies following a delay while a thunderstorm passed through. Kudos to the grounds crew at Piper's Heath – the course remained in good condition and well-drained despite two hours of heavy rain. The tournament hosted 114 golfers with about 20 more people joining the event for dinner.
May 19, 2016 - The Canadian Glass Association has prepared a lineup of expert presenters for the 2016 Glass Connections Conference. This annual event will be held in Ontario at the Westin Ottawa Hotel on September 13 – 14, 2016. The event will open with an evening Welcome Reception followed by a full-day of industry programming.
April 21, 2016 - Modern, transparent and prestigious – large glass façades are very much in vogue for office complexes and industrial buildings. Yet their use only makes sense in terms of energy savings and cost effectiveness if they also have air-conditioning functions and help the energy supply. The glass industry is therefore keen to promote the development of multifunctional windows and façade elements – an area where it has already achieved numerous promising innovations.
How central are concepts such as Industry 4.0 – the “FOURTH INDUSTRIAL Revolution” – and Smart Factory among SMEs in the glass industry? Let’s have a glimpse at tomorrow’s processes which have partly become reality today and also at realities which are still a long way off in the future.
The passion in the room was palpable at times when Geza Banfai, a veteran construction lawyer with McMillan in Toronto, addressed a gathering of the Ontario Glass and Metal Association at Richmond Hill Golf Club to update members on the Ontario government’s review of the Construction Lien Act and the potential for prompt payment legislation in the province.
Jan. 14, 2016 - High costs, a lack of integration possibilities and interest on the part of architects – solar modules for building skin integration are still niche products. But this could soon change. Thanks to more efficient solar cells and new dimensions, shapes and transparency levels, modules are becoming cheaper and more versatile. This might make them a standard feature in new buildings.
Dec. 16, 2015 - A recording of the Glass Canada Winter Webinar "Energy code implications for spandrel design: Quantifying and mitigating the effects of thermal bridging" with Stephane Hoffman of Morrison Hershfield is now available online. Hoffman's Dec. 14 presentation educated Glass Canada readers on his latest research into thermal bridging in spandrel assemblies and addressed several challenges in meeting today's tough standards for energy efficiency in building envelope construction. In the presentation, Hoffman took several questions from the online audience.
fa·çade  noun the face of a building, especially the principal front that looks onto a street or open space. synonyms: front, frontage, face, elevation, exterior, outside “a vinyl-sided façade” an outward appearance that is maintained to conceal a less pleasant or creditable reality.
"It’s an evolution, not a revolution.” That’s how James Janeteas, president of 3D printer provider Cimetrix Solutions, described additive manufacturing — or 3D printing as it is often called — at an event in Toronto late last year.
The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory uses a hot press to make spinel into conformable optics, like this flat sheet. “Ultimately, we’re going to hand it over to industry,” says Jas Sanghera, who leads the research, “so it has to be a scalable process.” In the lab, they made pieces eight inches in diameter. “Then we licensed the technology to a company who was able then to scale that up to much larger plates, about 30-inches wide.”Imagine a glass window that’s tough like armor, a camera lens that doesn’t get scratched in a sand storm or a smart phone that doesn’t break when dropped. Except it’s not glass, it’s a special ceramic called spinel that the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has been researching over the last 10 years. “Spinel is actually a mineral, it’s magnesium aluminate,” says Jas Sanghera, who leads the research. “The advantage is it’s so much tougher, stronger, harder than glass. It provides better protection in more hostile environments so it can withstand sand and rain erosion.” As a more durable material, a thinner layer of spinel can give better performance than glass. “For weight-sensitive platforms – unmanned autonomous vehicles, head-mounted face shields – it’s a game-changing technology,” he says.NRL invented a new way of making transparent spinel using a hot press, called sintering. It’s a low-temperature process, and the size of the pieces is limited only by the size of the press. “Ultimately, we’re going to hand it over to industry,” Sanghera says, “so it has to be a scalable process.” In the lab, they made pieces eight inches in diameter. “Then we licensed the technology to a company who was able then to scale that up to much larger plates, about 30-inches wide.”The sintering method also allows NRL to make optics in a number of shapes, “conformal with the surface of an airplane or UAV wing,” depending on the shape of the press.In addition to being tougher, stronger and harder, Sanghera says spinel has “unique optical properties. Not only can you see through it, but it allows infrared light to go through it.” That means the military, for imaging systems, “can use spinel as the window because it allows the infrared light to come through.”NRL is also looking at spinel for the windows on lasers operating in maritime and other hostile environments. “I’ve got to worry about wave slap and saltwater and things like that, and gun blasts going off. It’s got to be resistant to all that. And so that’s where spinel comes into its own,” Sanghera says. Says Sanghera, “Everything we do, we’re trying to push the mission. It’s designed to either enable a new application, a new capability, or enhance an existing one.”Spinel can be mined as a gemstone. A famous example is the Black Prince’s Ruby, which is actually spinel with a colour dopant. NRL chemists have also synthesized their own ultra-high purity spinel powder, and other synthetic versions are commercially available. “The precursors are all earth-abundant, so it’s available for reasonably low cost,” Sanghera says. The spinel NRL makes is a polycrystalline material, which means it is made of a lot of crystal particles all pressed together. With glass, “a crack that forms on the surface will go all the way through,” Sanghera explains. Spinel might chip but it won’t crack. “It’s like navigating through the asteroid belt, you create a tortuous path. If I have all these crystals packed together, the crack gets deflected at the hard crystals and you dissipate the crack energy.When scientists first started trying to make glass-like spinel, they were using a crucible instead of a press. “A big problem with growing crystals is that you have to melt the starting powder at very high temperatures: over 2,000 C,” Sanghera says. It’s expensive to heat a material that high, and “the molten material reacts with the crucible, so if you’re trying to make very high-quality crystals, you end up  with a huge amount of defects.” That’s why Sanghera and his colleagues turned to sintering. “You put the powder in a hot press then you press it under vacuum to squash the powder together. If you can do that right, then you can get rid of all the entrapped air and all of a sudden it comes out of there clear-looking.” If the press has flat plates, the spinel will come out flat. “But if I have a ball and socket joint and put the powder in there, I end up with a dome shape,” Sanghera says. “So we can make near-net-shape product that way.”NRL was not the first to try sintering. But previous attempts had yielded “a window where most of it would look cloudy and there would be an odd region here and there – about an inch or so – that was clear, and that would be core-drilled out.”So NRL deconstructed the science. They started with purer chemicals. “Lousy chemicals in, lousy material out,” Sanghera says. Then they discovered a second problem, this time with the sintering aid they were adding to the spinel powder. “It’s about one per cent of a different powder, in this case lithium fluoride,” Sanghera says. This “pixie dust” is meant to melt and “lubricate the powder particles, so there’s less friction, so they can all move together during sintering.” They were putting the powders together in shakers overnight, but “the thing is, on a scale of the powder, it’s never mixed uniformly.” Understanding the problem led to a unique solution for enabling uniform mixing. Now, “there’s only one pathway for densification,” and the spinel will come out clear across the press.To further increase the quality of the optic, “you can grind and polish this just like you would do gems,” Sanghera says. This is the most costly part of the process. “One of the things we’re looking at is, how do we reduce the finishing cost?” The surface of the press is imprinted onto the glass. “If we can improve upon that,” he says, “make that mirror finish, then – and so that’s where we get into a little bit of intellectual property – what’s the best way to do that?”For both the Department of Defense and private industry, “cost is a big driver, and so it’s important for us to make products? that can be affordable.”Unique applications for military and commercial use“There are a lot of applications,” Sanghera says. He mentions watches and consumer electronics, like the smart phone, as examples. The military in particular may want to use spinel as transparent armour for vehicles and face shields. A “bullet-proof” window today, for example, has layers of plastic and glass perhaps five inches thick. “If you replaced that with spinel, you’d reduce the weight by a factor of two or more,” Sanghera says.The military’s also interested in using spinel to better protect visible and infrared cameras on planes and other platforms. Glass doesn’t transmit infrared, so today’s optics are made of “exotic materials that are very soft and fragile,” and have multiple layers to compensate for colour distortions. “So that’s what we’ve been doing now, developing new optical materials,” Sanghera says. Spinel windows could also protect sensors on space satellites, an area Sanghera’s interested in testing.  “You could leave these out there for longer periods of time, go into environments that are harsher than what they’re encountering now, and enable more capabilities,” he says.NRL is also looking at spinel (and other materials) for next-generation lasers. “Lasers can be thought of as a box comprised of optics,” he says. “There’s passive and there’s active components. Passive is just a protective window, active is where we change the colour of light coming out the other end.” For passive laser applications, like exit apertures (windows), the key is high quality. “That window, if it’s got any impurities or junk, it can absorb that laser light,” Sanghera says. “When it absorbs, things heat up,” which can cause the window to break. Sanghera and his colleagues have demonstrated, working with “ultra high purity” spinel powder they’ve synthesized in NRL clean rooms, spinel’s incredible potential. For active laser applications, they’ve demonstrated how sintering can be used with materials other than spinel to make a laser that’s “excellent optical quality.” Instead of spinel, they use, “things like yttria or lutecia and dope them with rare earth ions.” NRL has transitioned both types of laser materials and applications to industry.   View the embedded image gallery online at: http://www.glasscanadamag.com/index.php?option=com_k2&view=latest&layout=latest&Itemid=1#sigProGalleria6d2da293ab Editor’s commentAlternative transparent materials in appliactions that require high impact resistance would be a welcome innovation in architectural glazing. Many designers have been looking for solutions to problems with traditional safety glass products. One example that springs to mind is balcony glass. There have been several instances in big Canadian cities of tempered balustrades in high-rise condominiums shattering and showering tempered glass “pebbles” into the street below, much to the concern of passers by and unit owners. The breakages were blamed on the expansion and contraction of nickel sulphide inclusions in the glass which are introduced as a normal byproduct of the primary float glass process. Heat soaking can ensure a lower percentage of inclusions in the glass that survives the process, but adds waste and cost without completely eliminating the problem. New standards for balcony guard construction and the use of laminated glass will probably ameliorate the issue going forward, but at the cost of some design restrictions. Sintered spinel panels would presumably be much stronger, offering increased protection to residents and pedestrians. Another area where safety glass has become not-so-safe is wired glass. Primarily used for fire resistance, wired glass has come under scrutiny lately following instances of people impacting the windows and cutting themselves on the metal wire interlayer. If spinel can take the heat of a laser without shattering, a regular fire should cause no problem. Of course, the cost of producing architectural-size sintered spinel panels is prohibitive right now. Perhaps some form of additive manufacturing process would offer a solution, as some kinds of 3D printers operate in a manner very similar to sintering. Again, technology that is some years off. So were smartphones in 1995. Sometimes it pays to keep an eye on what is coming next.  Reducing costsThe U.S. Naval Research Laboratory uses a hot press to make spinel, a process called sintering. It’s much less expensive than melting, and the size of the pieces is limited only by the size of the press. Lead researcher Jas Sanghera says, “You put the powder in a hot press then you press it under vacuum to squash the powder together. If you can do that right, then you can get rid of all the entrapped air and all of a sudden it comes out of there clear-looking.”  To further increase the quality of the optic, “You can grind and polish this just like you would do gems.”
Sept. 16, 2015 - More efficient production processes and constantly high quality standards: with a new insulating glass line, sedak based in Gersthofen, Germany further expands its leading position in the industry of oversize glass units. Machinery especially fabricated for the corporation, enables sedak now to industrially produce insulating glass units up to 15m. “The manufacturing time has been reduced and insulating glass units are therefore even more economical,” says sedak CEO Bernhard Veh.
Sept. 16, 2015 - AGNORA is providing architects with another tool to realize their dreams and enhance the aesthetics of their architectural glass designs. AGNORA has installed the largest ceramic ink digital glass printer in North and South America.
Design and Integration is what you might call a pure engineering company. Located in a nondescript industrial unit in Concord, Ont., Felix Gutnik and his team are quietly coming up with elegant solutions to common problems in glass processing automation without multimillion-dollar R&D budgets or any government support. All they really have is Gutnik’s lifelong passion for building and fixing mechanical things, and experience in the glass industry that now stretches back three decades. Design and Integration will probably build anything anyone asks them to, but their specialty is glass processing automation, including lamination lines, insulating glass assembly lines and material handling automation and equipment. They have provided a liquid lamination line with specialized tables for taping, tilting for assembly, filling and curing laminated glass units. That one was done in partnership with Uvekol.Film lamination was Felix’s introduction to the glass business through work he did with Kodak at a prior company. Over the year’s he’s come up with some nifty tricks for solving the notoriously tricky problems of automating film lamination. For instance, one design uses a two-level approach to achieve high-speed lamination even of irregular shapes. The line has two feeder conveyors, one over the other. One sheet is brought in and loaded into the top conveyor. The second is brought in and a worker places and trims the interlayer film. Then the bottom piece, with the interlayer on it, feeds through. As it emerges, the top sheet is precisely fed forward so that it droops down and its edge matches up with the edge of the bottom sheet. As the two pieces feed forward, the top sheet is gently laid onto the interlayer, with its weight forcing out any air between the layers. The system works just as well with round or odd-shaped glass as it does with rectangles. Design and Integration has also made a very cool cross-cut machine for quickly automating trimming on high-speed, mass production laminating operations. A panel of glass is fed under the film roller, which dispenses the film onto the surface. When its leading edge emerges on the other side, it hits a stop. A sensor stop drops down on the infeed side as the next sheet of glass comes along. When the second sheet hits the sensor, it pushes it forward until it hits the first panel. The sensor registers distance between the two stops, then retracts out of the way, leaving the two panels a very precise distance apart on the conveyor. The panels roll forward. As the back edge of the first panel emerges, a knife cuts off the film with almost no waste. At the same time, the second panel’s interlayer is placed. As long as each piece is long enough to reach past the film roller, panels of different lengths can have interlayer applied and cut without making any adjustments. Gutnik has also come up with a novel solution to curing PVB laminate without using an autoclave. The glass panels are put in vacuum bags and stacked on a large, portable rack that can hold dozens of sheets. The entire rack is then put into a lamination oven that goes through the necessary heating and cooling cycles to cure the interlayer. It takes about three hours to cure one batch. Meanwhile, a worker can be loading another rack with freshly assembled units ready for curing. The finished ones come out, the new ones go in and the baking can start again quickly. Gutnik likes this solution because it eliminates autoclaves and can make multiple large panels quickly. The slots on the rack he designed are 10 feet wide by 20 feet deep, and there are eight of them. The system has also been applied to a heat soaking application. So coming up with innovative solutions has never been a problem for Design and Integration. Gutnik credits his company’s size and the fact that the buck stops with him when it comes to engineering design. “Major companies have mechanical engineers, electric engineers, programmers, concept engineers, all this,” he explains. “The problem is, when a group of people try to develop a horse, sometimes it becomes a camel. Because I work in programming and electrical and mechanical and hydraulics, I design from one source. That’s why I have less screw-ups. But after 22 years in business, last year I made a major screw-up.”The screw-up Gutnik refers to is his attempt to develop a new kind of horizontal laminator for PVB, EVA and Sentry glass. The concept was to make a two-level system that would pass units through a compact furnace then automatically drop them with a scissor lift to a second level, right underneath, where they would be compressed in a press and heated again to achieve final bonding without an autoclave. The system could be designed with yet another conveyor level underneath the first two levels to let new units pass from the washer to a second inline laminator, effectively doubling the capacity of the line and taking all the product that a standard washer can put through.  Michael Byrne of Explore One is familiar with Gutnik’s prototype. “The goal was to build a machine that was about 1/10th the cost of traditional laminating systems that would require no vacuum bags and be installed with a footprint of as little as 1,200 square feet,” he explains. “The system would give smaller shops the capability to produce laminated glass in a very cost-effective manner. It would also allow for an unprecedented level of flexibility from a pure laminated glass production perspective.”Into every development process, some rain must fall. Gutnik’s bad weather began with an order of hydraulic relief valves. In the system, hot and cold fluid runs through a large platoon which heats and cools the glass in turn. Both the relief valves and the backup relief valves proved to be faulty and caused an overload in the system, causing 400-degree oil to explode out, destroying a significant portion of his prototype. The wrecked hulk of the first prototype now sits in his back lot, covered in a tarp. Gutnik had invested about $400,000 of his own money in the prototype. With the destruction of his parts, it became a significant challenge to continue development. One option he explored was assistance from one of the government programs that are supposedly eager to lavish money on innovative small businesses. What Gutnik and his team have found is that these programs are in fact set up to reward large, existing R&D departments with dedicated staff and budgets and labs with people in white coats. The paperwork requirements alone are impossible for a small operator to meet. According to Andrei Lagounov, one of Gutnik’s sales people, one government R&D program required paperwork justifying the expense of almost every single part they bought to build a prototype. When he saw similar paperwork from a large engine manufacturer, he saw that it was allowed to justify whole large assemblies in one document because the parts involved were already in its existing R&D inventory. “How is a small company supposed to do that?” Lagounov asks. “We buy the parts as we need them, and we rarely know ahead of time what we are going to need.”Design and Integration has weathered the storm and come out dry and smiling. At September’s GlassBuild, it will unveil the fully functioning Lami ExPress, a glass laminating system that eliminates the need for vacuum bagging or an autoclave. The system can process units of varying thicknesses and sizes with a batch area of seven by 10 feet. Design and Integration is quoting an energy cost per load of $2 and a cycle time of about 1:15, depending on the PVB used. The unit comes with touch screen controls and a Samsung tablet for mobile control. The total space required is 36 by 10 feet.So it’s one hard-won victory for Design and Integration. One hopes there are more on the way and that, some day, the agencies charged with encouraging companies like this will find some way to actually do their jobs. the LamiExpress the LamiExpress   View the embedded image gallery online at: http://www.glasscanadamag.com/index.php?option=com_k2&view=latest&layout=latest&Itemid=1#sigProGalleria1db1678a0a Concept to reality: the LamiExpressDesign and Integration’s LamiExpress will debut at GlassBuild America in September. It has the potential to save fabricators considerable time and floor space, and to make in-house lamination affordable for smaller shops. It is also optimized for integration into larger production lines. Laminates PVB, EVA or Sentry glass Multiple thicknesses and sizes can be laminated in one batch No vacuum bags, autoclaves or tac ovens Multiple layers can be applied next to single-layer glass Seven-by-10-foot total batch area Total footprint: 36 by 10 feet Design and Integration’s machines are built at the company’s facility in Concorde, Ont. Approximate delivery lead time is four months.
July 8, 2015 - Dymax Corporation’s European subsidiary, Dymax Europe GmbH, is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year.  Based in Wiesbaden Germany, the company offers light-curable adhesives, coatings, and gasketing materials for applications in a variety of markets.  In addition to adhesives and coatings, Dymax GmbH offers high-performance oligomers and a variety of dispensing and light-curing equipment to strengthen its position as a comprehensive systems supplier.
Coast to coast, Canadian glaziers and glass fabricators continue to revolutionize the urban environment with incredible achievements in architecture. Here are six projects that caught our eye.
Not long ago I attended the Top Glass Conference and Exhibits show in Mississauga, Ont., put on by Glass Canada and spent the day between manning the OGMA booth and schmoozing with visitors, exhibitors, old and new customers and former employees. This year’s event was particularly busy with a big showing of architects who came to get Ontario Association of Architects learning credits for attending some of the seminars put on. It seems that’s what it takes to get architects to attend glass-industry related conferences. At any rate, the organizers and exhibitors were thrilled with the turnout and I would strongly recommend manufacturers and suppliers to the commercial glass trade to sign on for the next Top Glass event.
The procurement policies of government agencies and publicly owned corporations require them to take reasonable steps to obtain the best value for their money and as a result most of them use variations of what is commonly known as competitive open procurement or open tendering.
Canadian manufacturers retain one significant advantage over our competition.
April 21, 2016 - Resource price weakness pushed the economies of Regina and Saskatoon into recession last year and will limit real GDP growth to just 1.1 per cent in 2016, according to The Conference Board of Canada's Metropolitan Outlook: Winter 2016. On the other hand, Winnipeg's economy is expected to expand at its fastest rate in 8 years, with a 2.5 per cent expansion forecast for 2016.
April 7, 2016 - Canada's Building Trades Unions (CBTU) and the National Construction Labour Relations Alliance (NCLRA) welcome the introduction of an Act to amend the Department of Public Works and Government Services Act (community benefit)   by MP Ahmed Hussen (York- South Weston).   Measures to improve the economic benefits of government spending are welcomed by industry stakeholders in construction.  The inclusion of apprenticeship and training requirements in federal infrastructure procurement shows the Government of Canada is serious about leadership in building the workforce of tomorrow.   
April 7, 2016 - Strong activity in British Columbia's construction industry is drawing skilled workers back to the province from Alberta and more young people are entering the trades, according to the 2016 Construction Industry Survey released today by the BC Construction Association, in partnership with Progressive Contractors Association and Construction Labour Relations.
Welcome to our April issue where the big focus is on Top Glass, our education and trade event for the commercial glazing industry. Interest and participation in Top Glass has exceeded all our expectations so far, and if the registration numbers and booth sales are any indication, we are in for another great show this year.
Mar. 10, 2016 - Last week, Finance Minister Charles Sousa released the Ontario budget for 2016. The masonry industry is happy to see that the Ontario Government is willing to continue investing in the province through pragmatic, balanced policy.
The early days of insulating glass in Canada were like the wild west. There were no standards, very limited technical knowledge, and upstart companies were beginning to spring up mindlessly slapping pieces of glass together and selling them to an unwitting public. The 30-storey B.C. Hydro Electric building in Vancouver was one of the first large scale projects to use sealed units and every unit failed within a year, giving the industry a black eye and raising questions about the future of this highly touted new product.
Workers at unionized construction workplaces in Ontario are more likely than their non-unionized counterparts to file job-related injury claims, but less likely to file claims that result in time off work.
Living in a steel box might sound Houdiniesque, but crafting a home out of a shipping container can be an escape from the ordinary. “There’s nothing odd about it,” says Christoph Kesting, a Waterloo, Ont.,-based advocate for social justice housing, who believes it’s possible to never buy anything new. “Whatever you want, you can find a used item somewhere. For those thinking environmentally, why not incorporate it into your house? All you need to do is buy a shipping container or three.”
June 16, 2016 - CSA Group has announced that its key accessibility standard has been referenced in the National Building Code (NBC), an important step toward the harmonization of accessible design requirements.
June 15, 2016 - The Insulating Glass Certification Council (IGCC), sponsor of the IGCC/IGMA certification program, North America's leading IG certification and quality assurance organization, is currently testing a pilot program that would enable IG manufacturers to provisionally certify their products in just 4 weeks. The existing full certification takes an average of 24 weeks. Provisional certification would enable the manufacturer to sell a certified product pending the outcome of full ASTM tests.
June 2, 2016 - The North American Contractor Certification (NACC) program continues it’s upward trend wrapping up a very successful beginning to 2016. NACC added three more contractors, bringing the total to ten that have gained certification in less than a year. In addition several more organizations are working through the process and certification with their approvals are imminent.
April 21, 2016 - The National Glass Association (NGA) has announced it has joined the Glazing Industry Code Committee (GICC).
Manufacturers can minimize their difficulties with on-site or “in-situ” testing by adhering to certain well-established quality-control principles, which can be important to reduce the chances of costly failures. Yes, on-site testing can be a complex undertaking. The number of components that that are encompassed within the scope of a typical on-site test may account for at least part of the complexity.
Mar. 10, 2016 - The National Glass Association (NGA) has published the newly revised Guide to the Glass and Glazing Requirements of the Model Building Codes—5th Edition, a valuable reference to federal glazing laws, local glazing regulations and how they are related to the model building codes. 
Feb. 11, 2016 - The American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) has updated and released a document laying out the process for determining the thermal performance characteristics of fenestration systems, specifically in commercial buildings. This document was last updated in 2012.
Architects and engineers are upping the game on building envelope design: unusual aesthetics, improved thermal performance and taking into account the human factor using daylighting controls.  The fenestration industry has felt the impact of these new designs and has risen to the challenge with complex products such as dynamic glazing and insulating glass configurations not seen before.
The Insulating Glass Manufacturers Alliance (IGMA) since it’s beginning has provided technical documents that support the glass design, specifications, energy efficiency, glazing procedures, performance data, testing, certification, quality assurance, field studies along with other guides relating to the manufacture, fabrication, design, and end use of insulating glass units.
If you haven’t already heard about accreditation programs in the glass industry, it’s clear you’re going to be hearing a lot more soon.One is the North American Contractor Certification (NACC) program, announced by the Architectural Glass Institute (AGI) in January 2015. In July, the names of the first NACC-certified companies were released – three U.S. firms, as well as Ferguson Neudorf Glass of Beamsville, Ont. Twelve more architectural glass & metal contractors are currently going through the certification process.The NACC program was created to provide baseline recognition for competency, business practices, and adherence to industry-accepted guidelines. The program “provides confidence to building owners as well as the design and construction community with defined processes, controls and procedures to help drive a higher-quality end product.” The NACC Board of Directors includes contractors, consultants, construction specialists and manufacturers. Administrative Management Systems (AMS) is the third-party certifier that administers the program. It has been doing this sort of work since 1997, for U.S. national associations such as the Safety Glazing Certification Council, Insulating Glass Manufacturer’s Alliance and the National Fenestration Rating Council. AMS President John Kent says NACC provides a differentiation that helps contractors, building owners, architects and the specification community to select competent companies and increase the likelihood of a successful project with lower re-work.Kent describes industry awareness of NACC in the U.S. and Canada as “likely minimal at present,” but points out that “the program is still very new. Eighteen months ago, it was just a concept.” Outreach to architects, builders and the specification community is underway through things like mailings and presentations, and an ongoing promotional plan was developed at the first NACC annual meeting in mid-September (in Atlanta, piggy-backed with GlassBuild). Additionally, as of August, Kent notes, “We were thrilled that through some really hard work by many people, the NACC program is now under ISO/IEC 17065 Accreditation by the American National Standards Institute (which has an agreement with the Safety Council of Canada).” Alberta glazing contractor Jim Brady shares his personal views on the program. “While I think that the idea has merit, it also has some underlying issues,” he says. “In Canada, construction processes are very regionalized...as a result, the architects and consultants for projects may or may not be onboard with NACC.” He adds that while he’s “all for” programs that recognize industry leaders, he fears that a program such as NACC might be a detriment to fair competition. “Just because one company doesn’t have NACC Accreditation doesn’t mean that they can’t give a good quality installation, and if not having that accreditation disqualifies them from quoting on the project, then it limits competition,” Brady observes, “thereby increasing prices to the end user (building owner). My guess is, most companies in Alberta would likely not participate in this program and they would only do so when backed into a corner.”Brady also wonders if the NACC board members include representation from smaller more regionalized companies. We asked AMS, and found out that of the five glazing contractors on the ten-person NACC accreditation board (the others being end-user companies such as building contractors), two companies are larger and three are smaller, with a good diversity of size always the aim. Other accreditation programsBrady notes that in Alberta, the Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training is used to educate tradespeople, but that the glazier trade in that province is not compulsory certified and apprenticeship is not mandatory. “Personally, I think this is wrong,” he says. “It is mandatory for someone to get training on hairdressing, but not for someone to change a sealed unit into a four-sided structural silicone curtainwall ten storeys off the ground.” Currently in Canada, Brady notes, the provinces of B.C., Alberta and Ontario have glazier apprenticeship training with in class instruction. “I am unsure about Quebec,” he says. “The Maritimes, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and the Territories do not. Some companies in Saskatchewan and Manitoba use the Alberta program. Nationally, the Red Seal program is in place, but…an individual merely has to prove they have a certain amount of hours in the trade, write an exam, and if they pass, they are recognized as a Red Seal Journeyman.”Glazier has been a Red Seal trade since 1986, and the related standards and exams have been updated several times. Julia Sullivan at the Red Seal Secretariat says “Earning a Red Seal endorsement provides good job prospects and allows individuals to work anywhere in Canada. Completing an apprenticeship in a Red Seal trade also gives access to many of the benefits available from the government.”  Brady would be strongly in favour of getting curriculum delivered to tradespeople in jurisdictions where there is no program, and processes to measure skills with both written and practical exams. “In my years as a champion for education, I have heard many people say ‘I can’t afford to send my people to school, we’re too busy, others may steal them away from me, etc.’ and my only response to them is ‘You can’t afford to not educate your people.’ ” Although he had not heard of NACC, Brady did point out Green Advantage (GA), an organization based in Maryland that’s now working to launch a ‘Curtainwall Installer Certification’ (GACIC) program. It will include written as well as performance exams with standards created by the International Glazier Certification Board, a broad array of industry experts from the U.S. and Canada. Tough standards?As Brady has noted, accreditation carries concerns. It can be a controversial issue because large companies can afford to put their people on the boards of the associated groups and certification bodies, thereby driving tougher and tougher accreditation standards, which may squeeze out competition from smaller companies. On the other hand, good accreditation programs can help buyers avoid fly-by-nighters without having to embark on time-consuming due-diligence searches. In addition, these programs can help prevent governments from having to step in to protect the public from shoddy workmanship. In one firm’s view, accreditation also helps companies take their reputation to the next level. “Raising the bar and being an industry leader is something that Ferguson Neudorf strives for every day, so [going for NACC accreditation] was natural for us,” says Peter Neudorf Junior, director of field operations at Ferguson Neudorf Glass (FNG) in Beamsville, Ontario. “We want to be above the norm.” FNG (founded in 1986, and now one of Canada’s largest curtainwall contractors) became NACC accredited in July. Neudorf says he and other leaders at the firm started talking about third-party accreditation a couple of years ago. “I sit on the Ontario and American Boards of the Architectural Glass and Metal Contractors Association and there have been many discussions about a certification specific to our trade,” he explains. “There are certainly issues with quality and standards within our industry and not all companies are committed to improving these standards. The general thought was that it’s time for some kind of accreditation and it’s time for architects and consultants to put their support behind this concept. My brothers and I decided to look into it, and I joined the advisory committee that got the necessary information to AMS to develop the NACC.” When asked about the most onerous or challenging of the NACC criteria, Neudorf says it was improving overall production flow and communication between departments. “We needed improvement in how sales, purchasing, engineering, fabrication and installation connected with one another,” he notes. “It was a challenge to make changes. Some of our people were resistant to change and didn’t recognize the benefits of adding the extra paperwork required to be a little more organized. Our team just kept pushing to have the necessary changes made to our standard procedures and added some new ones, making sure our management team were committed to getting things done in the way that best suited each department. It’s about more accountability, in the end.” Those at Ferguson Neudorf consider the NACC cost to be very fair. Neudorf says they’ve paid at least the same amount for other third party services in the past, “and this time it really helped us streamline our business.”  Kent says the total NACC cost is currently a little under $4,000 per year, but notes that there will likely also be internal costs for a firm to change things so that they comply with program requirements. “We feel these costs are a fraction of the savings available from increased efficiency, greater recognition and lower rework,” he says. “In fact, the number one comment we have received from companies undergoing the process is that ‘this NACC process will make us a better company.’ ”  In terms of industry acceptance, Kent believes that while recognition of certification is never an overnight event, the value always becomes recognized by the user community. “Each of the [other programs we administer] has enjoyed steady increased recognition for over 30 years. We fully believe the NACC program will be a significant force both in the U.S. and Canada in the coming months and years.”  Neudorf agrees that awareness and industry acceptance is going to take time. “I’d say maybe half of our industry in Canada are moving towards certification at this point,” he says. “The other half either don’t see the value or think it’s not for them. But companies who are interested in being accountable will want this.” He adds, “We’ve found that it’s been very positive, an eye-opener and a learning opportunity. It’s not something to be afraid of – it is not an audit but rather an evaluation. You should welcome it if you want to become a better company.”North American certification programsHere are just some of the agencies offering to certify your company, your work or your people.CSA Fenestration Installation Techniciancsa.caThe certification addresses the need to ensure the knowledge, skills and abilities of individuals who install factory assembled windows, exterior doors and unit skylights in residential buildings three stories or less. To become certified, individuals will have demonstrated proficiency in understanding and applying manufacturer installation instructions, general building principles, the CSA A440.4 window installation standard and other industry standards and/or best practices.Green Advantagegreenadvantage.orgGreen Advantage offers the longest standing green building certification targeted specifically to construction field personnel across trades. North American Contractor Certificationtheagi.orgThe NACC Program was created to provide certification recognition as a means of creating a baseline for competency, business practices, and adherence to industry-accepted guidelines. The program provides confidence to building owners as well as the design and construction community with defined processes, controls and procedures to help drive a higher quality end product.Red Sealred-seal.caThe Red Seal Program is the Canadian standard of excellence for skilled trades. Formally known as the Interprovincial Standards Red Seal Program, it sets common standards to assess the skills of tradespersons across Canada. Tradespersons who meet the Red Seal standards receive a Red Seal endorsement on their provincial/territorial trade certificates.Window Wisewindowwise.caWindow Wise is a replacement window quality assurance program designed to give homeowners peace of mind that investing in window replacement will be a lasting one. We approve window replacement manufacturers and certify window installation contractors.Energy Starnrcan.gc.caThe Energy Star Initiative is a voluntary partnership between the government of Canada and industry to make high efficiency products readily available and visible to Canadians. NRCan formally enrolls manufacturers, retailers and other organizations as participants in the Energy Star Initiative. Participants help promote Energy Star and ensure Energy Star-certified products are prominent and readily available in the marketplace and to Canadian consumers.
Oct. 9, 2015 -  The Accredited Standards Committee (ASC) Z97 announces the release of the 2015 version of industry standard ANSI Z97.1 Safety glazing materials used in buildings - safety performance specifications and methods of test.
Oct. 8, 2015 -  The American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) announces that its air-water-structural product certification program has been granted accreditation by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) in accordance with ISO/IEC 17065-2012 “Conformity assessment – Requirements for bodies certifying products, processes and services." The scope of the accreditation includes Doors and Windows (91.050.60). Accreditation to ISO/IEC 17065 confirms that administration of the AAMA certification program conforms to the high procedural standards of these international requirements.

Subscription Centre

 
New Subscription
 
Already a Subscriber
 
Customer Service
 
View Digital Magazine Renew


Coming Events

GlassCon Global
Wed Jul 06, 2016 @ 8:00am -
IGMA Summer Conference
Mon Aug 08, 2016 @ 8:00am - 05:00pm
Glass Connections
Tue Sep 13, 2016 @ 8:00am - 05:00pm
Glasstec
Tue Sep 20, 2016
GlassBuild
Wed Oct 19, 2016 @ 8:00am - 05:00pm
WinDoor North America
Tue Nov 15, 2016 @ 8:00am - 05:00pm