Fenestration Top Glass Buyers GuideDigital EditionTwitter
Nov. 18, 2015 - Glaston Corporation has closed a significant deal with U.S based Trulite Glass & Aluminium Solutions for three FC500 tempering furnaces including iControL Quantum Automation and Reporting system and Glaston Care service agreements. The order is split between the Q3 and Q4 2015 order book. The machines are delivered during the first and second quarters in 2016.
Nov. 6, 2015 - Terry Green, Director of Instructional Media at CRL-U.S. Aluminum, has received InstallationMasters certification from the American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA). With Terry’s certification, CRL-U.S. Aluminum aims to provide enhanced service and support to its customers.
Oct. 20, 2015 - On October 1st, C.R. Laurence welcomed the Stairbuilders and Manufacturers Association (SMA) for a one-day workshop at its ISO 9001:2008 certified manufacturing facilities in Los Angeles, California. The stair industry is seeing an increase in demand for glass and stainless steel railing systems. The central focus of the workshop was to address this development and share knowledge to help push the industry forward.
Hidden and protectedcapitolindustriesinc.comCapitol Industries’ new Magnetic M-1000 and M-7000 hide and protect lock cylinders and latches behind a corrosion-resistant sliding plate made of anodized aluminum. The cylinder shield protects the lock against vandalism, bumping, picking, drilling, contamination, unauthorized key use, as well as extreme weather. The products can be keyed alike or differently with over 10,000 combinations and the possibility of on-site key duplication, with proper tools and a key code. Regular magnets will not open the device. The M-Series products use rare earth magnets with a lifetime of over 80 years. Equipped with a patented, fully mechanical system, there is no need for wiring or batteries. To hide and protect the cylinder, simply slide the outer plate up. To unlock and reveal the cylinder, place the magnetic key in the key slot and slide the cover down. The devices may also lock in the open position and require the magnetic key to close. Ideal applications include storefronts, remote facilities, after-hours lockout, basic access control, maintenance rooms, construction sites and harsh environments.Style and securitymaglocks.comThe Rite Touch RT1050D offers sophisticated styling, convenience, flexible access control, safety and security for single or double glass doors. Suitable for indoor applications with no modification necessary to the glass, the easy-to-install, surface-mounted Rite Touch combines elegant aesthetics with the latest touchscreen technology. Contractors can distinguish an opening by harmonizing style and security with the Rite Touch.Matches any interiordorma.comDorma Americas has introduced its innovative new MUTO manual sliding door system. MUTO makes installation hassle-free with its compact, modular profile and easy integration of complementary functional elements. It offers a variety of features to provide convenience in everyday use. With aluminum finishes including clear anodized, similar to satin stainless steel anodized, and powder coat options, MUTO can be matched to virtually any architectural interior. The MUTO line includes the MUTO Basic and MUTO Comfort systems. Both offer technical features and aesthetic qualities that make them suitable for a wide variety of applications. System features include a self-closing door with no need for a power supply; a Dormotion damping device to decelerate door panels as they approach the open or closed positions, taking them to a gentle stop;  the option of integrating a status indicator to enable monitoring of the door from anywhere within the building; a standard wall and ceiling mounting and installation in suspended ceilings; an elegant body with sharp edges and a small recess for the logo clip. The MUTO system accommodates variable weight tolerances and movement patterns ranging from small single panels of 110 pounds or bi-parting panels up to 330 lbs per panel (or as high as 440 lb in MUTO Basic) while being capable of synchronized movement. Tempered laminated safety glass is used with availability of special interlayers for advanced function and customized glass design. MUTO uses a simple, two-step door panel height adjustment. MUTO Comfort comes standard with roller carriers for glass and, with the appropriate adapters, can also carry wood door panels. In the MUTO Basic system, the roller carriers directly attach to wood door panels, while adapters allow the use of glass panels.
"It’s an evolution, not a revolution.” That’s how James Janeteas, president of 3D printer provider Cimetrix Solutions, described additive manufacturing — or 3D printing as it is often called — at an event in Toronto late last year.
Glaston’s heating chamber upgrades are a cost-efficient way of lengthening the lifecycle of existing process machinery and improving overall profitability. Upgrades offer an ideal way to process glass smarter and support glass as the choice for sustainable business growth. The changeover can be completed in a short time with lower investment costs.
GlastonInsight is an intelligent online process assistance system that gives operators proposals based on real-time feedback about how to tune the heating process to achieve the highest possible glass quality. It is the first system in the market that automatically gives operators instant feedback from the process and enables them to make better operating decisions. GlastonInsight excels at helping glass processors get the most out of their tempering technology by maximizing quality, variation and capacity.
HTBS is a zero-tooling bending and tempering machine. With its flexibility and high end product quality, the furnace allows glass processors to meet the requirements of the market and achieve maximum efficiency. Its capability to process multiple glass sheets in one production load considerably helps increase production output.
GlastonAir is the successful result of Glaston’s extensive R&D work. The unique air flotation technology allows a higher exit temperature, making it possible to temper thin glass down to two millimeters. The stable bottom heating ensures excellent and consistent end product quality.
Glaston ProL is a patented flat laminating line designed to meet the growing demand for complex laminated glass that fulfills the highest quality standards required today.
The Glaston FC1000 is the result of continuous development from the Glaston FC500. Equipped with new technological advances, FC1000 meets stringent demands for glass quality, energy efficiency and low-E glass tempering capacity.
Sept. 16, 2015 - World-class glass fabrication tools and equipment are now available through HHH Tempering Resources Inc.’s (HHH) official partnership with K-Star Diamond Company, premier glazier’s equipment manufacturer.The signed contract launches a value-added HHH product line expansion for North American glass fabricators. Key tools now offered by HHH include: hand-held precision glass cutters, shape cutting tools and vacuum glass lifters.
Nov. 18, 2015 - With the constantly changing laws and regulations regarding workplace safety and workers health, a glazing contractor owner or manager cannot possibly stay up to date and in compliance without the assistance of a professional in this field.
Nov. 6, 2015 - The American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) welcomed Ken Gronbach as keynote speaker for the AAMA 2015 National Fall Conference. Gronbach is a demographer, futurist and author who writes about how countries’ age curves interact to create the opportunities and challenges of the world we live in today and what the future will bring for people, profits and the planet. Gronbach spoke about his research and work on Mon., Oct. 19, during the conference.
Nov. 6, 2015 - The age of transparency is here, and it’s a major focus of green building standards and codes, said Aaron Smith, director of sustainable building solutions for ASSA ABLOY Door Security Solutions. Smith, LEED® AP BD+C, gave a presentation called Opening the Door to Transparency - LEED v4, EPDs and HPDs at the American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) 2015 Fall Conference.
Oct. 20, 2015 - The American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) has added Diana Hanson, regulatory affairs manager, to its ranks. Hanson comes to AAMA with association experience as a founding member of the North American Deck and Railing Association (NADRA).
Business consultant Mike Tyson once said “Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the face.” So what do you do when you get punched in the face? You shake it off and come up with a new plan. Welcome to 2015 GlassBuild America held Sept. 16 to 18 in Atlanta which was full of more than 7,600 attendees and 420 exhibitors fine-tuning new plans.
When I think back on past Windoor shows, I can always think of at least one reason why participation paid off. As each November approaches I anticipate the hum of the show floor as attendees enter the exhibit hall to search out and validate required products and services. There was always something good to take from every show.
IG Certification Programs are now recognized and required by fenestration certification and rating programs such as Energy Star, the American Architectural Manufacturers Association, the Window and Door Manufacturers Association and the National Fenestration Rating Council, recognizing the critical importance of the IG unit on the overall durability and performance of fenestration systems.
Canadian Glass AssociationThe CGA has partnered with the Glass Association of North America to offer several manuals. During the last CGA board of directors meeting, it was confirmed that the association would work in partnership with GANA to sell GANA Manuals to CGA members at a reduced rate, and in Canadian funds.
Oct. 8, 2015 -  The Buildings Show, the leader in sourcing, networking and education for the North American design, construction, and real estate communities, returns to the Metro Toronto Convention Centre (MTCC) December 2 – 4, 2015, supported by Construction Market Data, BILD, Toronto Construction Association, Ontario Association of Architects, Canadian Construction Association, Real Estate Institute of Canada, Ready Mixed Concrete Association of Ontario, BOMA Toronto, Interior Designers of Canada, and Royal Architectural Institute of Canada.
Oct. 8, 2015 - The Insulating Glass Manufacturers Alliance today announced that AIR-INS has become its newest Bronze Sponsor of the upcoming 2015 IGMA Fall Technical Conference, joining a total of ten corporate sponsors of the event. The Conference takes place October 5-8th in Denver, Colorado. The AIR-INS Inc. laboratory specializes in evaluating the performance of fenestration products. Over the years, AIR-INS President Robert Jutras has been involved in the evolution of the fenestration industry, particularly, by sharing his knowledge through direct involvement in multiple Canadian associations and committees.
Sept. 28, 2015 - The Insulating Glass Manufacturers Alliance has issued a comprehensive report to members ahead of its Oct. 5 Fall Conference in Denver, Colo. The newsletter includes updates on the activities of many committees and an itinerary for the conference. 
Sept. 25, 2015 - The date for the Insulating Glass Manufacturing Alliance's Summer Conference appearing on the Sept. 24 edition of Glass Canada's e-newsletter is incorrect. The conference will take place Oct. 5 - 8 in Denver, Colo.
"It’s an evolution, not a revolution.” That’s how James Janeteas, president of 3D printer provider Cimetrix Solutions, described additive manufacturing — or 3D printing as it is often called — at an event in Toronto late last year.
The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory uses a hot press to make spinel into conformable optics, like this flat sheet. “Ultimately, we’re going to hand it over to industry,” says Jas Sanghera, who leads the research, “so it has to be a scalable process.” In the lab, they made pieces eight inches in diameter. “Then we licensed the technology to a company who was able then to scale that up to much larger plates, about 30-inches wide.”Imagine a glass window that’s tough like armor, a camera lens that doesn’t get scratched in a sand storm or a smart phone that doesn’t break when dropped. Except it’s not glass, it’s a special ceramic called spinel that the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has been researching over the last 10 years. “Spinel is actually a mineral, it’s magnesium aluminate,” says Jas Sanghera, who leads the research. “The advantage is it’s so much tougher, stronger, harder than glass. It provides better protection in more hostile environments so it can withstand sand and rain erosion.” As a more durable material, a thinner layer of spinel can give better performance than glass. “For weight-sensitive platforms – unmanned autonomous vehicles, head-mounted face shields – it’s a game-changing technology,” he says.NRL invented a new way of making transparent spinel using a hot press, called sintering. It’s a low-temperature process, and the size of the pieces is limited only by the size of the press. “Ultimately, we’re going to hand it over to industry,” Sanghera says, “so it has to be a scalable process.” In the lab, they made pieces eight inches in diameter. “Then we licensed the technology to a company who was able then to scale that up to much larger plates, about 30-inches wide.”The sintering method also allows NRL to make optics in a number of shapes, “conformal with the surface of an airplane or UAV wing,” depending on the shape of the press.In addition to being tougher, stronger and harder, Sanghera says spinel has “unique optical properties. Not only can you see through it, but it allows infrared light to go through it.” That means the military, for imaging systems, “can use spinel as the window because it allows the infrared light to come through.”NRL is also looking at spinel for the windows on lasers operating in maritime and other hostile environments. “I’ve got to worry about wave slap and saltwater and things like that, and gun blasts going off. It’s got to be resistant to all that. And so that’s where spinel comes into its own,” Sanghera says. Says Sanghera, “Everything we do, we’re trying to push the mission. It’s designed to either enable a new application, a new capability, or enhance an existing one.”Spinel can be mined as a gemstone. A famous example is the Black Prince’s Ruby, which is actually spinel with a colour dopant. NRL chemists have also synthesized their own ultra-high purity spinel powder, and other synthetic versions are commercially available. “The precursors are all earth-abundant, so it’s available for reasonably low cost,” Sanghera says. The spinel NRL makes is a polycrystalline material, which means it is made of a lot of crystal particles all pressed together. With glass, “a crack that forms on the surface will go all the way through,” Sanghera explains. Spinel might chip but it won’t crack. “It’s like navigating through the asteroid belt, you create a tortuous path. If I have all these crystals packed together, the crack gets deflected at the hard crystals and you dissipate the crack energy.When scientists first started trying to make glass-like spinel, they were using a crucible instead of a press. “A big problem with growing crystals is that you have to melt the starting powder at very high temperatures: over 2,000 C,” Sanghera says. It’s expensive to heat a material that high, and “the molten material reacts with the crucible, so if you’re trying to make very high-quality crystals, you end up  with a huge amount of defects.” That’s why Sanghera and his colleagues turned to sintering. “You put the powder in a hot press then you press it under vacuum to squash the powder together. If you can do that right, then you can get rid of all the entrapped air and all of a sudden it comes out of there clear-looking.” If the press has flat plates, the spinel will come out flat. “But if I have a ball and socket joint and put the powder in there, I end up with a dome shape,” Sanghera says. “So we can make near-net-shape product that way.”NRL was not the first to try sintering. But previous attempts had yielded “a window where most of it would look cloudy and there would be an odd region here and there – about an inch or so – that was clear, and that would be core-drilled out.”So NRL deconstructed the science. They started with purer chemicals. “Lousy chemicals in, lousy material out,” Sanghera says. Then they discovered a second problem, this time with the sintering aid they were adding to the spinel powder. “It’s about one per cent of a different powder, in this case lithium fluoride,” Sanghera says. This “pixie dust” is meant to melt and “lubricate the powder particles, so there’s less friction, so they can all move together during sintering.” They were putting the powders together in shakers overnight, but “the thing is, on a scale of the powder, it’s never mixed uniformly.” Understanding the problem led to a unique solution for enabling uniform mixing. Now, “there’s only one pathway for densification,” and the spinel will come out clear across the press.To further increase the quality of the optic, “you can grind and polish this just like you would do gems,” Sanghera says. This is the most costly part of the process. “One of the things we’re looking at is, how do we reduce the finishing cost?” The surface of the press is imprinted onto the glass. “If we can improve upon that,” he says, “make that mirror finish, then – and so that’s where we get into a little bit of intellectual property – what’s the best way to do that?”For both the Department of Defense and private industry, “cost is a big driver, and so it’s important for us to make products? that can be affordable.”Unique applications for military and commercial use“There are a lot of applications,” Sanghera says. He mentions watches and consumer electronics, like the smart phone, as examples. The military in particular may want to use spinel as transparent armour for vehicles and face shields. A “bullet-proof” window today, for example, has layers of plastic and glass perhaps five inches thick. “If you replaced that with spinel, you’d reduce the weight by a factor of two or more,” Sanghera says.The military’s also interested in using spinel to better protect visible and infrared cameras on planes and other platforms. Glass doesn’t transmit infrared, so today’s optics are made of “exotic materials that are very soft and fragile,” and have multiple layers to compensate for colour distortions. “So that’s what we’ve been doing now, developing new optical materials,” Sanghera says. Spinel windows could also protect sensors on space satellites, an area Sanghera’s interested in testing.  “You could leave these out there for longer periods of time, go into environments that are harsher than what they’re encountering now, and enable more capabilities,” he says.NRL is also looking at spinel (and other materials) for next-generation lasers. “Lasers can be thought of as a box comprised of optics,” he says. “There’s passive and there’s active components. Passive is just a protective window, active is where we change the colour of light coming out the other end.” For passive laser applications, like exit apertures (windows), the key is high quality. “That window, if it’s got any impurities or junk, it can absorb that laser light,” Sanghera says. “When it absorbs, things heat up,” which can cause the window to break. Sanghera and his colleagues have demonstrated, working with “ultra high purity” spinel powder they’ve synthesized in NRL clean rooms, spinel’s incredible potential. For active laser applications, they’ve demonstrated how sintering can be used with materials other than spinel to make a laser that’s “excellent optical quality.” Instead of spinel, they use, “things like yttria or lutecia and dope them with rare earth ions.” NRL has transitioned both types of laser materials and applications to industry.   View the embedded image gallery online at: http://www.glasscanadamag.com/index.php?option=com_k2&view=latest&layout=latest&Itemid=1#sigProGalleria6d2da293ab Editor’s commentAlternative transparent materials in appliactions that require high impact resistance would be a welcome innovation in architectural glazing. Many designers have been looking for solutions to problems with traditional safety glass products. One example that springs to mind is balcony glass. There have been several instances in big Canadian cities of tempered balustrades in high-rise condominiums shattering and showering tempered glass “pebbles” into the street below, much to the concern of passers by and unit owners. The breakages were blamed on the expansion and contraction of nickel sulphide inclusions in the glass which are introduced as a normal byproduct of the primary float glass process. Heat soaking can ensure a lower percentage of inclusions in the glass that survives the process, but adds waste and cost without completely eliminating the problem. New standards for balcony guard construction and the use of laminated glass will probably ameliorate the issue going forward, but at the cost of some design restrictions. Sintered spinel panels would presumably be much stronger, offering increased protection to residents and pedestrians. Another area where safety glass has become not-so-safe is wired glass. Primarily used for fire resistance, wired glass has come under scrutiny lately following instances of people impacting the windows and cutting themselves on the metal wire interlayer. If spinel can take the heat of a laser without shattering, a regular fire should cause no problem. Of course, the cost of producing architectural-size sintered spinel panels is prohibitive right now. Perhaps some form of additive manufacturing process would offer a solution, as some kinds of 3D printers operate in a manner very similar to sintering. Again, technology that is some years off. So were smartphones in 1995. Sometimes it pays to keep an eye on what is coming next.  Reducing costsThe U.S. Naval Research Laboratory uses a hot press to make spinel, a process called sintering. It’s much less expensive than melting, and the size of the pieces is limited only by the size of the press. Lead researcher Jas Sanghera says, “You put the powder in a hot press then you press it under vacuum to squash the powder together. If you can do that right, then you can get rid of all the entrapped air and all of a sudden it comes out of there clear-looking.”  To further increase the quality of the optic, “You can grind and polish this just like you would do gems.”
Sept. 16, 2015 - More efficient production processes and constantly high quality standards: with a new insulating glass line, sedak based in Gersthofen, Germany further expands its leading position in the industry of oversize glass units. Machinery especially fabricated for the corporation, enables sedak now to industrially produce insulating glass units up to 15m. “The manufacturing time has been reduced and insulating glass units are therefore even more economical,” says sedak CEO Bernhard Veh.
Sept. 16, 2015 - AGNORA is providing architects with another tool to realize their dreams and enhance the aesthetics of their architectural glass designs. AGNORA has installed the largest ceramic ink digital glass printer in North and South America.
Design and Integration is what you might call a pure engineering company. Located in a nondescript industrial unit in Concord, Ont., Felix Gutnik and his team are quietly coming up with elegant solutions to common problems in glass processing automation without multimillion-dollar R&D budgets or any government support. All they really have is Gutnik’s lifelong passion for building and fixing mechanical things, and experience in the glass industry that now stretches back three decades. Design and Integration will probably build anything anyone asks them to, but their specialty is glass processing automation, including lamination lines, insulating glass assembly lines and material handling automation and equipment. They have provided a liquid lamination line with specialized tables for taping, tilting for assembly, filling and curing laminated glass units. That one was done in partnership with Uvekol.Film lamination was Felix’s introduction to the glass business through work he did with Kodak at a prior company. Over the year’s he’s come up with some nifty tricks for solving the notoriously tricky problems of automating film lamination. For instance, one design uses a two-level approach to achieve high-speed lamination even of irregular shapes. The line has two feeder conveyors, one over the other. One sheet is brought in and loaded into the top conveyor. The second is brought in and a worker places and trims the interlayer film. Then the bottom piece, with the interlayer on it, feeds through. As it emerges, the top sheet is precisely fed forward so that it droops down and its edge matches up with the edge of the bottom sheet. As the two pieces feed forward, the top sheet is gently laid onto the interlayer, with its weight forcing out any air between the layers. The system works just as well with round or odd-shaped glass as it does with rectangles. Design and Integration has also made a very cool cross-cut machine for quickly automating trimming on high-speed, mass production laminating operations. A panel of glass is fed under the film roller, which dispenses the film onto the surface. When its leading edge emerges on the other side, it hits a stop. A sensor stop drops down on the infeed side as the next sheet of glass comes along. When the second sheet hits the sensor, it pushes it forward until it hits the first panel. The sensor registers distance between the two stops, then retracts out of the way, leaving the two panels a very precise distance apart on the conveyor. The panels roll forward. As the back edge of the first panel emerges, a knife cuts off the film with almost no waste. At the same time, the second panel’s interlayer is placed. As long as each piece is long enough to reach past the film roller, panels of different lengths can have interlayer applied and cut without making any adjustments. Gutnik has also come up with a novel solution to curing PVB laminate without using an autoclave. The glass panels are put in vacuum bags and stacked on a large, portable rack that can hold dozens of sheets. The entire rack is then put into a lamination oven that goes through the necessary heating and cooling cycles to cure the interlayer. It takes about three hours to cure one batch. Meanwhile, a worker can be loading another rack with freshly assembled units ready for curing. The finished ones come out, the new ones go in and the baking can start again quickly. Gutnik likes this solution because it eliminates autoclaves and can make multiple large panels quickly. The slots on the rack he designed are 10 feet wide by 20 feet deep, and there are eight of them. The system has also been applied to a heat soaking application. So coming up with innovative solutions has never been a problem for Design and Integration. Gutnik credits his company’s size and the fact that the buck stops with him when it comes to engineering design. “Major companies have mechanical engineers, electric engineers, programmers, concept engineers, all this,” he explains. “The problem is, when a group of people try to develop a horse, sometimes it becomes a camel. Because I work in programming and electrical and mechanical and hydraulics, I design from one source. That’s why I have less screw-ups. But after 22 years in business, last year I made a major screw-up.”The screw-up Gutnik refers to is his attempt to develop a new kind of horizontal laminator for PVB, EVA and Sentry glass. The concept was to make a two-level system that would pass units through a compact furnace then automatically drop them with a scissor lift to a second level, right underneath, where they would be compressed in a press and heated again to achieve final bonding without an autoclave. The system could be designed with yet another conveyor level underneath the first two levels to let new units pass from the washer to a second inline laminator, effectively doubling the capacity of the line and taking all the product that a standard washer can put through.  Michael Byrne of Explore One is familiar with Gutnik’s prototype. “The goal was to build a machine that was about 1/10th the cost of traditional laminating systems that would require no vacuum bags and be installed with a footprint of as little as 1,200 square feet,” he explains. “The system would give smaller shops the capability to produce laminated glass in a very cost-effective manner. It would also allow for an unprecedented level of flexibility from a pure laminated glass production perspective.”Into every development process, some rain must fall. Gutnik’s bad weather began with an order of hydraulic relief valves. In the system, hot and cold fluid runs through a large platoon which heats and cools the glass in turn. Both the relief valves and the backup relief valves proved to be faulty and caused an overload in the system, causing 400-degree oil to explode out, destroying a significant portion of his prototype. The wrecked hulk of the first prototype now sits in his back lot, covered in a tarp. Gutnik had invested about $400,000 of his own money in the prototype. With the destruction of his parts, it became a significant challenge to continue development. One option he explored was assistance from one of the government programs that are supposedly eager to lavish money on innovative small businesses. What Gutnik and his team have found is that these programs are in fact set up to reward large, existing R&D departments with dedicated staff and budgets and labs with people in white coats. The paperwork requirements alone are impossible for a small operator to meet. According to Andrei Lagounov, one of Gutnik’s sales people, one government R&D program required paperwork justifying the expense of almost every single part they bought to build a prototype. When he saw similar paperwork from a large engine manufacturer, he saw that it was allowed to justify whole large assemblies in one document because the parts involved were already in its existing R&D inventory. “How is a small company supposed to do that?” Lagounov asks. “We buy the parts as we need them, and we rarely know ahead of time what we are going to need.”Design and Integration has weathered the storm and come out dry and smiling. At September’s GlassBuild, it will unveil the fully functioning Lami ExPress, a glass laminating system that eliminates the need for vacuum bagging or an autoclave. The system can process units of varying thicknesses and sizes with a batch area of seven by 10 feet. Design and Integration is quoting an energy cost per load of $2 and a cycle time of about 1:15, depending on the PVB used. The unit comes with touch screen controls and a Samsung tablet for mobile control. The total space required is 36 by 10 feet.So it’s one hard-won victory for Design and Integration. One hopes there are more on the way and that, some day, the agencies charged with encouraging companies like this will find some way to actually do their jobs. the LamiExpress the LamiExpress   View the embedded image gallery online at: http://www.glasscanadamag.com/index.php?option=com_k2&view=latest&layout=latest&Itemid=1#sigProGalleria1db1678a0a Concept to reality: the LamiExpressDesign and Integration’s LamiExpress will debut at GlassBuild America in September. It has the potential to save fabricators considerable time and floor space, and to make in-house lamination affordable for smaller shops. It is also optimized for integration into larger production lines. Laminates PVB, EVA or Sentry glass Multiple thicknesses and sizes can be laminated in one batch No vacuum bags, autoclaves or tac ovens Multiple layers can be applied next to single-layer glass Seven-by-10-foot total batch area Total footprint: 36 by 10 feet Design and Integration’s machines are built at the company’s facility in Concorde, Ont. Approximate delivery lead time is four months.
July 8, 2015 - Dymax Corporation’s European subsidiary, Dymax Europe GmbH, is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year.  Based in Wiesbaden Germany, the company offers light-curable adhesives, coatings, and gasketing materials for applications in a variety of markets.  In addition to adhesives and coatings, Dymax GmbH offers high-performance oligomers and a variety of dispensing and light-curing equipment to strengthen its position as a comprehensive systems supplier.
April 24, 2015 - A comprehensive online resource from Creative Safety Supply teaches companies the 5S industrial organization system associated with Lean business methods. Through videos, text and diagrams, visitors are linked to extensive information on how to Sort, Set in Order, Shine, Standardize and Sustain their work environments for maximum efficiency.
Silk screening without heat and laminating without an autoclave.
The Insulating Glass Manufacturers Alliance (IGMA) is preparing to release an informational paper giving an extensive overview on the subject of vacuum insulating glass (VIG).
Dec. 3, 2014 - Researchers based at Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed a new form of ‘rubber-like’ glass which may have applications in high temperature or strongly oxidative environments.
Nov. 17, 2014 - Four months after being unveiled at the AIA National Convention in Chicago, the ViraconGlass iPad app is now available as a web app on the Viracon website. Architects and designers can use the app on their personal computers or any operating system, thanks to its browser-based functionality.
Nov. 6, 2014 - Soon to be one of the venues for the 2015 Pan American Games in Toronto, Canada, the CIBC Pan Am/Parapan Am Aquatics Centre & Field House (PAAC) will host competitions during the largest multisport event ever to be held in Canada – double the size of the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver.
Nov. 6, 2015 - Eye Trax jobsite security cameras can be monitored and programmed through Eye Trax’s exclusive User Interactive Mobile Application. Eye Trax security cameras users can log into a mobile-friendly website via any smartphone or tablet. From there, users have access to all of the cameras in their network, where “live” images can be viewed from an individual camera, time-lapse videos can be created, photos and videos can be shared on social media platforms, and adjustments can be made to camera settings. Eye Trax User Interactive Mobile Application provides flexibility for business owners and site managers to monitor jobsites anywhere, at any time, as well as eliminates the need of a computer to interact with security cameras.
Oct. 22, 2015 - The Centre for Food (CFF) at Durham College (DC) distinguishes itself in the highly competitive field of culinary education by bringing together culinary, hospitality, event management, food science, and agricultural and horticultural programs in a state-of-the-art facility for “field-to-fork” culinary education. 
Oct. 22, 2015 - Investment in non-residential building construction amounted to $12.9 billion in the third quarter, down 0.5% from the previous quarter. This was the third consecutive quarterly decline and largely reflected lower spending on the construction of commercial and industrial buildings.
You may recall that in the June, 2015 issue we discussed the press release from the Ontario Ministry of the Attorney General where the law firm of Borden Ladner Gervais LLP had been appointed to conduct an expert review of the Construction Lien Act. Their review had been scheduled to be completed by the end of 2015 but that is now looking unlikely.
Along with two other interested parties I recently completed a literature survey and report on the potential impact of climate change on Canadian buildings and infrastructure. The report was more like speculation than hard-core research because we didn’t test any of our conclusions or suggestions.
Our cover story this week is about accreditation of glazing companies, a topic I imagine will get very different reactions depending on the reader. It’s a new thing for the Canadian glass industry, but certainly not a new idea in business. How people react to the idea of accreditation says a lot to me about where they are as a business and how they approach the market.
Oct. 8, 2015 -  The total value of building permits decreased 3.7% to $7.5 billion in August, following increases of 15.5% in June and 0.7% in July (revised data). The decline was attributable to lower construction intentions in most provinces, mainly British Columbia, Alberta, Quebec and Saskatchewan.
It was a way back in February 2010 when I penned that hard-hitting journalistic gem about our cronies’ expedition to Las Vegas to commemorate the 60th birthday of good, old Brian Wiles. You may recall the good-natured banter about Brian and our trip that concluded with, “Next time you see him, you may want to ask if that’s ‘Old Man Smell’ cologne he’s wearing.”
The National Film Board of Canada recently won an International Emmy Award for its innovative documentary titled Highrise/Out My Window. The compelling web documentary allows viewers the opportunity to take a glimpse “through the windows” at the lives of 14 different high rise residents. The video can be found at outmywindow.nfb.ca.
Specifying glass using good, better or best options is a basic concept that can be instrumental in the selection and design process. Various considerations for your glass selections will include safety, energy, loads, and security for a basic system, and can be improved with specialty high performance products to address sound, glare, aesthetics, and performance concerns. These value-added products will differentiate your project to exceed common expectations and would be better/best options.
If discussions over beers at industry gatherings are any indication, there are some who are on the brink of abandoning Canada as a market. The complaints are familiar, but exacerbated at the moment because of the surge in demand in the recovered U.S. construction industry compared to the relative stagnation here.
July 27, 2015 - Lawyers charged with conducting a review of the Ontario Construction Liens Act have released a comprehensive document designed to educate industry stakeholders about the issues the review will be considering this fall. The document contains valuable background on the present law and common practices surrounding payment for construction contracting, and lists dozens of proposals for remedies and improvements that the review will consider. Upon completion of the review later this year, Bruce Reynolds, lead counsel for the review, will report his findings to the Ontario government including input gathered from across the Ontario construction industry. This information is expected to inform Ontario government policy going forward, including possible new legislation and/or regulations governing payment practices. The Ontario Glass and Metal Association is circulating the report and encouraging Ontario glaziers to submit their comments.
If you haven’t already heard about accreditation programs in the glass industry, it’s clear you’re going to be hearing a lot more soon.One is the North American Contractor Certification (NACC) program, announced by the Architectural Glass Institute (AGI) in January 2015. In July, the names of the first NACC-certified companies were released – three U.S. firms, as well as Ferguson Neudorf Glass of Beamsville, Ont. Twelve more architectural glass & metal contractors are currently going through the certification process.The NACC program was created to provide baseline recognition for competency, business practices, and adherence to industry-accepted guidelines. The program “provides confidence to building owners as well as the design and construction community with defined processes, controls and procedures to help drive a higher-quality end product.” The NACC Board of Directors includes contractors, consultants, construction specialists and manufacturers. Administrative Management Systems (AMS) is the third-party certifier that administers the program. It has been doing this sort of work since 1997, for U.S. national associations such as the Safety Glazing Certification Council, Insulating Glass Manufacturer’s Alliance and the National Fenestration Rating Council. AMS President John Kent says NACC provides a differentiation that helps contractors, building owners, architects and the specification community to select competent companies and increase the likelihood of a successful project with lower re-work.Kent describes industry awareness of NACC in the U.S. and Canada as “likely minimal at present,” but points out that “the program is still very new. Eighteen months ago, it was just a concept.” Outreach to architects, builders and the specification community is underway through things like mailings and presentations, and an ongoing promotional plan was developed at the first NACC annual meeting in mid-September (in Atlanta, piggy-backed with GlassBuild). Additionally, as of August, Kent notes, “We were thrilled that through some really hard work by many people, the NACC program is now under ISO/IEC 17065 Accreditation by the American National Standards Institute (which has an agreement with the Safety Council of Canada).” Alberta glazing contractor Jim Brady shares his personal views on the program. “While I think that the idea has merit, it also has some underlying issues,” he says. “In Canada, construction processes are very regionalized...as a result, the architects and consultants for projects may or may not be onboard with NACC.” He adds that while he’s “all for” programs that recognize industry leaders, he fears that a program such as NACC might be a detriment to fair competition. “Just because one company doesn’t have NACC Accreditation doesn’t mean that they can’t give a good quality installation, and if not having that accreditation disqualifies them from quoting on the project, then it limits competition,” Brady observes, “thereby increasing prices to the end user (building owner). My guess is, most companies in Alberta would likely not participate in this program and they would only do so when backed into a corner.”Brady also wonders if the NACC board members include representation from smaller more regionalized companies. We asked AMS, and found out that of the five glazing contractors on the ten-person NACC accreditation board (the others being end-user companies such as building contractors), two companies are larger and three are smaller, with a good diversity of size always the aim. Other accreditation programsBrady notes that in Alberta, the Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training is used to educate tradespeople, but that the glazier trade in that province is not compulsory certified and apprenticeship is not mandatory. “Personally, I think this is wrong,” he says. “It is mandatory for someone to get training on hairdressing, but not for someone to change a sealed unit into a four-sided structural silicone curtainwall ten storeys off the ground.” Currently in Canada, Brady notes, the provinces of B.C., Alberta and Ontario have glazier apprenticeship training with in class instruction. “I am unsure about Quebec,” he says. “The Maritimes, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and the Territories do not. Some companies in Saskatchewan and Manitoba use the Alberta program. Nationally, the Red Seal program is in place, but…an individual merely has to prove they have a certain amount of hours in the trade, write an exam, and if they pass, they are recognized as a Red Seal Journeyman.”Glazier has been a Red Seal trade since 1986, and the related standards and exams have been updated several times. Julia Sullivan at the Red Seal Secretariat says “Earning a Red Seal endorsement provides good job prospects and allows individuals to work anywhere in Canada. Completing an apprenticeship in a Red Seal trade also gives access to many of the benefits available from the government.”  Brady would be strongly in favour of getting curriculum delivered to tradespeople in jurisdictions where there is no program, and processes to measure skills with both written and practical exams. “In my years as a champion for education, I have heard many people say ‘I can’t afford to send my people to school, we’re too busy, others may steal them away from me, etc.’ and my only response to them is ‘You can’t afford to not educate your people.’ ” Although he had not heard of NACC, Brady did point out Green Advantage (GA), an organization based in Maryland that’s now working to launch a ‘Curtainwall Installer Certification’ (GACIC) program. It will include written as well as performance exams with standards created by the International Glazier Certification Board, a broad array of industry experts from the U.S. and Canada. Tough standards?As Brady has noted, accreditation carries concerns. It can be a controversial issue because large companies can afford to put their people on the boards of the associated groups and certification bodies, thereby driving tougher and tougher accreditation standards, which may squeeze out competition from smaller companies. On the other hand, good accreditation programs can help buyers avoid fly-by-nighters without having to embark on time-consuming due-diligence searches. In addition, these programs can help prevent governments from having to step in to protect the public from shoddy workmanship. In one firm’s view, accreditation also helps companies take their reputation to the next level. “Raising the bar and being an industry leader is something that Ferguson Neudorf strives for every day, so [going for NACC accreditation] was natural for us,” says Peter Neudorf Junior, director of field operations at Ferguson Neudorf Glass (FNG) in Beamsville, Ontario. “We want to be above the norm.” FNG (founded in 1986, and now one of Canada’s largest curtainwall contractors) became NACC accredited in July. Neudorf says he and other leaders at the firm started talking about third-party accreditation a couple of years ago. “I sit on the Ontario and American Boards of the Architectural Glass and Metal Contractors Association and there have been many discussions about a certification specific to our trade,” he explains. “There are certainly issues with quality and standards within our industry and not all companies are committed to improving these standards. The general thought was that it’s time for some kind of accreditation and it’s time for architects and consultants to put their support behind this concept. My brothers and I decided to look into it, and I joined the advisory committee that got the necessary information to AMS to develop the NACC.” When asked about the most onerous or challenging of the NACC criteria, Neudorf says it was improving overall production flow and communication between departments. “We needed improvement in how sales, purchasing, engineering, fabrication and installation connected with one another,” he notes. “It was a challenge to make changes. Some of our people were resistant to change and didn’t recognize the benefits of adding the extra paperwork required to be a little more organized. Our team just kept pushing to have the necessary changes made to our standard procedures and added some new ones, making sure our management team were committed to getting things done in the way that best suited each department. It’s about more accountability, in the end.” Those at Ferguson Neudorf consider the NACC cost to be very fair. Neudorf says they’ve paid at least the same amount for other third party services in the past, “and this time it really helped us streamline our business.”  Kent says the total NACC cost is currently a little under $4,000 per year, but notes that there will likely also be internal costs for a firm to change things so that they comply with program requirements. “We feel these costs are a fraction of the savings available from increased efficiency, greater recognition and lower rework,” he says. “In fact, the number one comment we have received from companies undergoing the process is that ‘this NACC process will make us a better company.’ ”  In terms of industry acceptance, Kent believes that while recognition of certification is never an overnight event, the value always becomes recognized by the user community. “Each of the [other programs we administer] has enjoyed steady increased recognition for over 30 years. We fully believe the NACC program will be a significant force both in the U.S. and Canada in the coming months and years.”  Neudorf agrees that awareness and industry acceptance is going to take time. “I’d say maybe half of our industry in Canada are moving towards certification at this point,” he says. “The other half either don’t see the value or think it’s not for them. But companies who are interested in being accountable will want this.” He adds, “We’ve found that it’s been very positive, an eye-opener and a learning opportunity. It’s not something to be afraid of – it is not an audit but rather an evaluation. You should welcome it if you want to become a better company.”North American certification programsHere are just some of the agencies offering to certify your company, your work or your people.CSA Fenestration Installation Techniciancsa.caThe certification addresses the need to ensure the knowledge, skills and abilities of individuals who install factory assembled windows, exterior doors and unit skylights in residential buildings three stories or less. To become certified, individuals will have demonstrated proficiency in understanding and applying manufacturer installation instructions, general building principles, the CSA A440.4 window installation standard and other industry standards and/or best practices.Green Advantagegreenadvantage.orgGreen Advantage offers the longest standing green building certification targeted specifically to construction field personnel across trades. North American Contractor Certificationtheagi.orgThe NACC Program was created to provide certification recognition as a means of creating a baseline for competency, business practices, and adherence to industry-accepted guidelines. The program provides confidence to building owners as well as the design and construction community with defined processes, controls and procedures to help drive a higher quality end product.Red Sealred-seal.caThe Red Seal Program is the Canadian standard of excellence for skilled trades. Formally known as the Interprovincial Standards Red Seal Program, it sets common standards to assess the skills of tradespersons across Canada. Tradespersons who meet the Red Seal standards receive a Red Seal endorsement on their provincial/territorial trade certificates.Window Wisewindowwise.caWindow Wise is a replacement window quality assurance program designed to give homeowners peace of mind that investing in window replacement will be a lasting one. We approve window replacement manufacturers and certify window installation contractors.Energy Starnrcan.gc.caThe Energy Star Initiative is a voluntary partnership between the government of Canada and industry to make high efficiency products readily available and visible to Canadians. NRCan formally enrolls manufacturers, retailers and other organizations as participants in the Energy Star Initiative. Participants help promote Energy Star and ensure Energy Star-certified products are prominent and readily available in the marketplace and to Canadian consumers.
Oct. 9, 2015 -  The Accredited Standards Committee (ASC) Z97 announces the release of the 2015 version of industry standard ANSI Z97.1 Safety glazing materials used in buildings - safety performance specifications and methods of test.
Oct. 8, 2015 -  The American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) announces that its air-water-structural product certification program has been granted accreditation by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) in accordance with ISO/IEC 17065-2012 “Conformity assessment – Requirements for bodies certifying products, processes and services." The scope of the accreditation includes Doors and Windows (91.050.60). Accreditation to ISO/IEC 17065 confirms that administration of the AAMA certification program conforms to the high procedural standards of these international requirements.
Sept. 28, 2015 - The Institute for Environmental Research and Education has published North America's first Product Category Rule for windows, enabling window fabricators to develop Environmental Product Declarations recognized by ISO and the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED program. PCRs define the inputs into the window manufacturing process and lay out guidelines for how each input must be documented in a Life Cycle Impact Assessment that ultimately leads to an EPD describing the overall environmental impact of manufacturing the product. The PCR, titled Earthsure PCR Cradle-to-Gate 30171600:2015, covers window inputs from their source to the fabricator's gate, and is designed to inform the B-to-B market. Another PCR addressing the B-to-C vertical is due for release soon, according to a recent IGMA newsletter.
Aug. 27, 2015 - The American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) has updated and released a document specifying requirements for corrosion resistant coatings on carbon steels used for hardware components in window, door and skylight applications. The document previously was updated in 2012.
The Insulating Glass Manufacturers Alliance has recently released its technical bulletin TB-2600-15 Vacuum Insulating Glass which is an informational document giving an extensive overview on the subject of vacuum insulating glass (VIG). This is one of the documents that the IGMA Emerging Technologies and Innovations Committee worked on for over a year, in which we believe readers will find an compilation of some very interesting and educational information along with data relative to VIG.
July 31, 2015 - The American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) has updated and released a document specifying test methods, specifications, and field checks used to evaluate the structural adequacy of wall systems and their ability to resist water penetration and air leakage. Other optional tests also are included. AAMA 501-15 is intended to be referenced in current laboratory and field testing methods for exterior wall systems comprised of curtain walls, storefronts and sloped glazing. It was previously updated in 2005.
July 15, 2015 - The National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) is renewing its commitment to providing the commercial fenestration industry with an energy performance certified rating program.
June 24, 2015 - The American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) has updated and released two documents specific to aluminum finishes: AAMA 612-15, Voluntary Specification, Performance Requirements, and Test Procedures for Combined Coatings of Anodic Oxide and Transparent Organic Coatings on Architectural Aluminum, and AAMA 2603-15, Voluntary Specification, Performance Requirements and Test Procedures for Pigmented Organic Coatings on Aluminum Extrusions and Panels (with Coil Coating Appendix).
The Insulating Glass Manufacturers Alliance (IGMA) has announced the release of a new Vacuum Insulating Glass Technical Bulletin on its webstore. The bulletin is intended to assist residential or commercial insulating glass and window manufacturers on the topic of vacuum insulating glazing (VIG).
March 25, 2015, Schaumberg, Il. - The American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) has updated and released two documents specific to aluminum: the combined AAMA 609 & 610-15, “Cleaning and Maintenance Guide for Architecturally Finished Aluminum” and CW-10-15, "Care and Handling of Architectural Aluminum from Shop to Site."
March 9, 2015 - The American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) has updated a document specific to sound control for fenestration products.

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